Mount Pleasant Memorial Granted Listed Status

The Postal Workers’ War Memorial at Mount Pleasant sorting office has been listed at Grade II.  This is part of an English Heritage scheme to list up to 500 war memorials a year over the next five years to mark the centenary of the First World War.

4 August commemoration event at the Mount Pleasant Memorial.

4 August commemoration event at the Mount Pleasant Memorial.

Postal Workers War Memorial at Mount Pleasant.

Postal Workers War Memorial at Mount Pleasant.

The war memorial commemorates 130 postal workers of the Western District who lost their lives in the First World War.  Originally constructed at the Wimpole Street Post Office by their colleagues with funds raised from the staff of the district, it was unveiled on New Year’s Day, 1920.  A further plaque was added listing 56 workers who lost their lives in the Second World War.

When the Wimpole street office closed in 1981, the memorial was moved to the delivery offices at Rathbone place, and then to the sorting office in Mount Pleasant in 2013.

4 August - First World War commemoration ceremony at Mount Pleasant memorial.

4 August – First World War commemoration ceremony at Mount Pleasant memorial.

4 August - First World War commemoration ceremony at Mount Pleasant memorial.

4 August – First World War commemoration ceremony at Mount Pleasant memorial.

You can find out more information about the Mount Pleasant memorial along with information about Post Office war memorials around England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

NEW EXHIBITION Innovation in the air: The 80th anniversary of inland airmail

20 August 2014 marks the 80th anniversary of UK inland airmail delivery. To mark this fascinating story we are hosting a new display in the BPMA Foyer and Search Room from 20 August to 20 October.

Alongside the display will be the chance to look through facsimile examples of newspaper reports from 1934; visitors can read first-hand accounts of the storm chaos that overshadowed the inaugural flight on 20 August. Evening newspaper headlines were quick to tell the public of the bumpy start to the service. Contemporary accounts from the time scream aloud ‘Britain’s Great Air-Mail Muddle’ and tell of the ‘Mail Planes In Gale Ordeal… Chairman of New Line ‘Bumped’ Through Roof’.

Airmail logo.

Airmail logo.

Alongside a discussion of the merits and limitations of the new airmail service, the display will also look at other unusual methods to deliver the post that were trialled around this time- namely the ultra-imaginative but ultimately unsuccessful rocket mail, which saw mail actually delivered in specially designed rockets.

Newspaper report and picture of Zucker’s rocket exploding on Scarp,  The Daily Telegraph, 1 August 1934.

Newspaper report and picture of Zucker’s rocket exploding on Scarp,
The Daily Telegraph, 1 August 1934.

Partly burnt items of mail, singed during the rocket explosions, can still be seen in our collection today.

‘How is the Post Office to make itself heard, to capture the interest and attention of the public, upon which there are already so many claims?’ – Sir Stephen Tallents, 1934

With the growing volume of letters sent by air came the idea of having special letter boxes for their collection. In 1930 the Post Office began painting pillar boxes to be used for airmail collections an ‘Air Force’ blue colour. The eye catching blue boxes promoted and advertised the new airmail service now available to the public. On display for the duration of the BPMA display will be a blue ‘Air Mail’ pillar box.

Our airmail pillar box.

Our airmail pillar box.

By 1934, the Post Office had become very conscious of design. A Public Relations department had been created under Sir Stephen Tallents. Theyre Lee- Elliott was commissioned to redesign labels, leaflets and posters especially for the new airmail service. Based upon stylised wings the new label was introduced on 25 July 1934. Just prior to that, on 17 May 1934, a new flag was authorised for aircraft carrying the Royal Mail.

Available alongside the display, from our Post & Go machine, will be a special commemorative Post & Go stamp, which will include a pictorial element for the first time. The underprint will incorporate the airmail logo designed by Theyre Lee-Elliott in 1934 for use on Inland Airmail posters, flyers and labels, with the text “Inland Airmail 1934”.

Check out our airmail shop range for first day covers, mugs, postcards and much more!

We will also be launching a Google Cultural Institute online exhibition on Wednesday exploring the stories of innovation in delivering the post. ‘Post Haste’ will look at the unusual and imaginative ways that have been used to transport the mail from cats to rockets and many more!

- Dominique Gardner, Exhibitions Officer

COMING SOON: New FREE downloadable First World War learning resource

From next Friday (22 August) you will be able to download a FREE First World War learning resource from postalheritage.org.uk/fwwlearning. Here is a look at what is inside…

In Last Post, war time characters guide your pupils through different topics. From the importance of female postal workers on the Home Front to the telegram messenger boys tasked with delivering news of the fallen, you will discover how mail was sent to soldiers and find out about the sacrifices made by the Post Office Rifles regiment who fought on the Front Line.

B. Conflict

What’s Inside:
This resource supports learning across the curriculum in Key Stages 1, 2 and 3.

  • Lesson plans
  • Teacher’s notes
  • Over 100 activity ideas
  • Image galleries
  • PowerPoints for whiteboards

Pupils will use real archival documents, photographs, maps and museum objects to discover how the postal service went to war. With cross-circular activities including how to make a Morse code transmitter and how to send a secret message by pigeon post. Last Post reveals stories of memorials and medals, soldiers and stamps, censorship and communication and much more!

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‘To Warwick with Love’ – The Private Postcards of an Aristocratic Family, 1914-1917

This Thursday we welcome Aaron Manning from the Warwick Castle History Team as he gives his evening talk ‘To Warwick with Love’ – The Private Postcards of an Aristocratic Family, 1914-1917.

Upon arrival enjoy a complimentary glass of wine and experience the nostalgic music of the First World War era. Then, sit back and allow Aaron to reveal, for the first time, a century-old hidden story from the castle.

First World War era postcard

First World War era postcard.

For nearly a hundred years a box of postcards lay hidden and untouched in the living quarters of the castle. A box of postcards that would tell the tragic story of how war tore apart the family of the Earl of Warwick. These intimate messages, sent between mother, father and children during the First World War, will be shared by Aaron in this fascinating, poignant talk.

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Finish off your evening by further immersing yourself into the story through investigating first hand a selection of these copied postcards, with our speaker Aaron on hand to answer any of your questions.

To book your place:

Online at: http://postalheritage.org.uk/page/to-warwick-with-love-2
Phone us on 020 7239 2570

Event details:

Post Office Time capsule opened after 93 years

On Monday, the centenary of the First World War, the contents of a time capsule created by Dundee postal workers in 1921 were unveiled. Head of Collections Chris Taft attended the event along with representatives from Royal Mail, Post Office Ltd, the Communication Workers Union, the High School of Dundee (where the former Post Office building from 1921 is now located), The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery & Museum and The Great War Dundee Partnership.  

Inside there were documents relating to the period including publications, newspaper cuttings, letters and photographs from soldiers.

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Field Marshall Douglas Haig in Dundee 1920. (Image credit: The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery & Museum/ University of Dundee)

Group photo of Dundee Postal War Memorial Committee.

Group photo of Dundee Postal War Memorial Committee. (Image credit: The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery & Museum/University of Dundee)

Pte J Brady Black Watch showing tricycle used by collectors 1914.

Pte J Brady Black Watch showing tricycle used by collectors 1914. (Image credit: The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery & Museum/University of Dundee)

A store of photographs of local dignitaries, soldiers and postmen and scenes of Dundee, including visits by Princess Mary in 1920 and Winston Churchill in 1921 were found in the capsule.

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There is also a number of sealed envelopes including a Letter from Lord Provost Spence (1921) to the Lord Provost in 2014 and a Letter to the Postmaster of Dundee in 2014 from the Postmaster in 1921.

Letter from the Postmaster to the current Postmaster.

Letter from the Postmaster to the current Postmaster.

The capsule and its contents will be on display at the McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery & Museum, and we will be sharing more about the contents soon!

4 August 1914: Commemorating the First World War

To commemorate today, 100 years since England entered the First World War, Head of Collections Chris Taft reflects on the essential role of the Post Office and its people at home and on the front.

Exactly 100 years ago today the world descended into chaos and changed forever, as England declared war on Germany. In the words of Wilfred Owen, poet and soldier, the ‘Winter of the World’ closed in. Every person in Britain was to be impacted as was every industry. For no industry can this be truer than for the British Post Office, it touched the lives of everyone. For many it was an employer, for even more it was a part of their community and for everyone it was the primary means of communication. By 1914 the Post Office was managing postal communication, telephones and the telegraph. It was also a central point of contact with government departments where people could collect forms, licences and pensions. Any global event was to have an impact on such a key organisation, and certainly the First World War was to.

Photograph of Sergeant Thomas May (second from left on front row) of the Post Office Rifles with the rest of his company outside some tents. (2013-0021/3)

Photograph of Sergeant Thomas May (second from left on front row) of the Post Office Rifles with the rest of his company outside some tents. (2013-0021/3)

As the European or Great War as it was known at the time broke out the Post Office was immediately called up. On the day war broke the Postmaster General was instructed that the Post Office was to take charge of censorship, initially this was just for letters coming from or going to Germany but gradually this role expanded until by later in the War censorship became a major weapon in the fight.

The duties expected of the postal service were many, from censorship already mentioned to managing the separation allowances, relief fund, war bonds and ration books. All this on top of the ordinary duty of delivering mail, as well as the massively expanded task of delivering mail to a World at war.

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The role the Post Office was to play in the First World War is explored on our online exhibition Last Post: Remembering the First World War. The story is also told in the Last Post Exhibition which is currently on at the Coalbrookdale Gallery at the Ironbridge Gorge Museum and touring at venues around the country.

The biggest impact however was to be in respect of the people. Over 75,000 men of the Post Office went off to fight. Over 8,000 of these men were to never return. After the war, memorials began to be erected up and down the country to colleagues who lost their lives, today there are over 350 such memorials to postal and telecommunication workers.

Home Depot, Armistice Dat 11 November 1918 (POST 56/6)

Home Depot, Armistice Dat 11 November 1918 (POST 56/6)

As the men left to fight tens of thousands of women took on new role helping to keep the communications lines open both by delivering mail at home and helping to sort the mail for the troops in sorting offices in Britain and in Northern France and Belgium. Their contribution was immense.

As we remember the dawning of the ‘Winter of the World’ we must most of all remember all those people who played their part in the war that was meant to end all wars.

-Chris Taft, Head of Collections

To commemorate the beginning of the First World War, we have added all new content to our online exhibition, Last Post.

#MuseumCats Day: “Industrial chaos in the Post Office cat world’

For #MuseumCats day, we wanted to share the history of cats in post offices from the first three probationary, rodent-killer to the famous 23-lb goliath Tibs in the 1950s and 60s. Sadly the last Post Office Headquarters official cat, Blackie, died in 1984. Since then there have been no more employed cats, but their 100+ years history is not to be fur-gotten.

Cats were first officially appointed by the Post Office to catch rodents in September 1868 (although there had undoubtedly been cats in post offices before). Three cats worked on probation at the Money Order Office in London, with an allowance of one shilling a week. They were given 6 months by the Secretary of the Post Office to reduce the mouse problem or they would be cut.

Tibs the Official Post Office Headquarters Cat

Tibs the Official Post Office Headquarters Cat

Luckily the cats did ‘their duty very efficiently’ and in 1873 they were awarded an increase of 6d per week. The official use of cats soon spread to other post offices with the cost of maintaining them varying.

Letter requesting a cat (POST 121/206).

Letter requesting expenditure for cat (POST 121/206).

Fast forward 80 years to 1952, when there was public outrage at the fact that Post Office cats hadn’t received a raise since 1873! The following year a question was raised in the House of Commons asking the Assistant Postmaster General, Mr L D Gammans, “when the allowance payable for the maintenance of cats in his department was last raised…”

Mr Gammans replied that “There is, I am afraid, a certain amount of industrial chaos in The Post Office cat world. Allowances vary in different places, possibly according to the alleged efficiency of the animals and other factors. It has proved impossible to organise any scheme for payment by results or output bonus…there has been a general wage freeze since July 1918, but there have been no complaints!”

The most popular cat of all, however, was named Tibs, who was born in November 1950. At his biggest, Tibs weighed 23lbs and lived in the Headquarters’ refreshment club in the basement of the building. He not only kept Post Office Headquarters completely mouse-free during his 14 years’ service, but found time to appear at a ‘cats and film stars’ party and have his portrait included in a 1953 book Cockney Cats. Tibs worked diligently until his death in November 1964.

Tibs' obituary from Post Office Magazine 1965.

Tibs’ obituary from Post Office Magazine 1965.

The last Post Office HQ cat, Blackie, died in June 1984, since when there have been no more cats employed at Post Office Headquarters.

Find out more about the role of cats, dogs and horses in the postal service.