Pop-Up Author event with Elizabeth Garrett Anderson school

Yesterday we were delighted to host a Pop-Up Education Author Event. Pop Up Education connect authors with schools through inspirational educational programmes.

We welcomed Cathy Brett, author and illustrator of Everything is Fine (and other lies I tell myself) and a class of year nine students from Elizabeth Garrett Anderson school to our archive.

Students from Elizabeth Garrett Anderson School meet author Cathy Brett.

The plot of Everything is Fine revolves around the First World War letters the protagonist Esther uncovers through peeling back the wall paper in her bedroom. Finding the letters sets Esther on a journey of discovery into the past. Our Author Event linked Cathy’s fictional story with the real First World War material in our collection.

In our archive the students saw original First World War letters, postcards and photographs. Through exploring this material they found out about the postmen and women who sorted, censored and delivered letters like those found by Esther in the book.

Following that, Cathy led a masterclass where she talked about how she became an author and illustrator. She introduced them to the character of Amelia, a First World War nurse and demonstrated her fantastic creative skills.

The students wrote letters that they imagined would be sent to Amelia through the Post Box Time Machine.

Students illustrate their letters to the past.

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Here’s a little selection of what the students had to say about the Author event:

‘I liked seeing letters from over 100 years ago and learning about peoples experiences’ (Ladan)
‘Now I know what women did in the Post Office when the men went to war’ (Tashika)
‘I liked doing the letter to Amelia from the Time Machine’ (Tashika)
‘I enjoyed seeing actual pictures of the postal workers back then’ (Ahlaam)
‘I enjoyed writing letters to each other and that we can actually send them’ (Abida)

We’d like to say thank you to Pop Up Education for arranging this event. We had a great time hosting Cathy and the students.

-Sally Sculthorpe, Learning Officer

Royal Mail Archive added to UNESCO Memories of the World Register

Recently the BPMA has received some exciting news. The Royal Mail Archive, which we look after, has been added to UNESCO’s Memories of the World Register. The archive spans the years 1636 to 1969 and covers a wide range of items from promotional posters to the Penny Black and employment records to telegrams about the Titanic.

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Telegram telling of the sinking of the Titanic

UNESCO was impressed by the unique insight the archive offers into the development of communication within the UK and abroad and the way it reflects the social and personal impact that the postal service has had upon people across the country.

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GPO poster

Head of Archives Vicky Parkinson tells us about being added to this year’s list of inscriptions:

“Back in 2011 my colleagues attended that year’s inscription reception following the successful nomination of the work of the GPO film unit, which was a joint application with our colleagues in the BFI and BT. On the back of that success we felt that the Royal Mail Archive was worthy of inscription and the nomination paperwork was submitted in January of this year.

We were delighted to hear that the UNESCO committee agreed with us and on the 19 June 2014 Helen Forde, Chair of our Board of Trustees, and I travelled to Edinburgh to attend the award ceremony, along with the other successful nominees.

Vicky and Helen

Vicky and Helen at the reception. Photo by Lesley Ann Ercolano

The reception, hosted by Lloyds Banking Group at their iconic site on the Mound in Edinburgh, was about celebrating the UK’s outstanding history and raising awareness about some of the country’s documentary riches. For me it was a wonderful reminder of how the archive, and the work we do to look after it and make it available, fits into the bigger picture of how history, and more importantly the original records, still play a vital role in today’s society.

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One of the thousands of photos in the collection – women mending parcels at the Home Depot during the First World War

For those of us lucky enough to work with the archive on a day to day basis it’s easy to see just how significant the collection is, documenting the vital role the postal service has played in the UK. Having that importance recognised by schemes such as UNESCO’s UK Memory of the World Register and the Arts Council’s Designation scheme is a vital way of spreading awareness of the riches we have in our custody.”

It is these stories and more that will be told in The Postal Museum when it opens in 2016. To hear some of these fantastic stories, and see the wealth of objects all of our collections hold, before then keep an eye on the blog. Over the coming months BPMA staff will be telling you all their favourite stories and showing you all manner of intriguing and enticing objects.

Guest post: Why “Traditional” is often better than “Digital”

After working at The Guardian Newspaper for 5 years Nick Huxsted is now a freelance digital marketing specialist working with a number of large and small organisations across the UK. He has featured on a number of blogs including The Guardian, Hip & Healthy and is a regular contributor of Weekend Notes. When not glued to his laptop Nick likes to relax by staying glued to his iPad.

The Post Office handles 23,000,000 letters a day, 1947. Designer: G R Morris (POST 109/195)

Designer: G R Morris (POST 109/195)

Cramp is usually associated with prolonged periods of exercise. Typically reserved for the legs and arms after a vigorous game of tennis or competing in an often under prepared fun run. It certainly wasn’t expected half way down a sheet of A4 when composing a letter to my grandmother. My hands, that while at school were accustomed to such seemingly simple tasks; had become weak, withered, useless writing implements unable to cope with the herculean effort of writing a short letter. The digital world with its endless button pushing and mouse clicking, had robbed my hands of its calligraphic strength. Instead of the fluid, elegant letter I had imagined the end results was an almost illegible scrawl that only the most gifted or graphologists would be able to decipher. Although extremely touched that I’d gone to the effort of sending her a letter, my grandmother had to call to ask what the content of my letter contained. So in an attempt to toughen up my hands I’ve recently been writing more letters, and the response I’ve received from the numerous recipients has been very surprising indeed. In an age where text speak, emails and social media has become all too common, hand-written letters it would appear not only stand out from the crowd, but have a much more emotional reaction from the recipient. In an attempt to bring back traditional forms of communication, here are some of the reasons why people tend to love receiving a hand written, illegible letter. Showing you care It takes almost no effort to send an email. We perform the daily ritual without ever giving it a moment’s notice, bashing out our message and relying on auto-correct and the delete button to compose a suitable message. Taking the time to consider, plan and compose a personal letter means you actually start to think about what you want to say. It will always be more descriptive, honest and thoughtful. Much more compelling than a text message with a smiley face attached to the end of it. The effort will surely not be lost on the lucky recipient. Memories When we move house, spring clean our wardrobe or clean under the bed, we often come across the boxes that contain many of our memories. The diaries, school essays and letters from loved ones frequently evoke a sense of nostalgia that are tactile, physical reminders of our past. The musty smell and slight brown tinge all promote a sense of nostalgia that is difficult to replicate by searching our old email archives. A message sandwiched between a reminder about PPI Insurance and Gym membership doesn’t really have the same sentimental value. Traditional letters provide a much more emotive glimpse into our past and history. Stand out from the crowd It’s common practice nowadays to send a “thank you” email after a meeting, a job application or attending a social event like a wedding. The sheer volume of messages we receive on a daily basis can either be physically lost in Mr Spam, or become the same standard blurb that we’ve all read a thousand times before. It’s much more likely that you’ll make an impression and stand out from the crowd if you’ve taken the time to send personal thank you. With the job market proving to become increasingly competitive, any advantage you can gain over other candidates is surely worthwhile. What would 60 million stamp collectors do? With such a large number of stamp collectors in the world the postal service is a constant source of culture and tradition that has seen John Lennon, Freddie Mercury and Maria Sharapova join the stamp collecting ranks. With the British Guiana 1c magenta selling for a cool £4.66m and the most expensive item in weight and volume ever known, the postal service has helped sustain the hobby of millions who take joy in looking after and collecting valuable stamps. Romance Whenever Hollywood decides to break out the hankies and craft a new romance movie, you can rest assured that there will always be a scene where the boy woo’s the girl with a romantic letter, expressing his complicated but soon to be overcome obstacles of affection. “My friend really likes you” messages on Facebook really don’t cut the mustard in comparison. So the next time you want to send someone a message, have a think about how important his or her reply is to you. It may just be worthwhile enduring the temporary affects of cramp.

The Role of the Post Office in the First World War

Join us this Thursday from 7pm-8pm to learn more about the vital role of the Post Office during the First World War from delivering mail to setting up quick forms of communication through telgraph lines. In this quick post, Head of Collections, Chris Taft introduces what you can expect. You can book your place online.

Sorting mail in the Home Depot at Regents Park, London (POST 56/6).

Sorting mail in the Home Depot at Regents Park, London (POST 56/6).

At the outbreak of the First World War postal communication was a vital way of troops keeping in touch with loved ones at home. The British Post Office’s role in the war effort was therefore essential. Its role however was far broader than just delivering mail. Over 75,000 men of the Post Office went off to serve in the armed forces throughout the war years and the postal service at home had to carry on as well as expanding to deliver mail to a world at war. The contribution however went far beyond this and with the loss of men to the war effort the Post Office was employing thousands of temporary workers, including women taking on roles previously the reserve of men for the first-time.

Human Ladder For Telephone'. Two men in uniform, one standing on the other's shoulders.

Human Ladder For Telephone’. Two men in uniform, one standing on the other’s shoulders.

The Post Office was also managing the Separations Allowance and Relief Fund and of course managing the parcel traffic. This talk will explore the variety of these roles and the contribution the Post Office made as well as touching on the commemoration of the war that still plays a role in the modern Royal Mail.

-Chris Taft, Head of Collections

£3 per person. £2.50 for concessions*

* Concessions 60+ (accompanied children under 12 free)

Book online or via phone 020 7239 2570

Limited number of tickets available on the night.

Students from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Massachusetts visit the BPMA

We are a group of four students from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. At the beginning of the summer, from May 12th to June 28th, we had the privilege of working with the British Postal Museum and Archive to develop better visitor evaluation strategies. The goal of our project was to help improve visitor evaluation within their exhibitions which primarily focused on the Last Post Exhibition.

Mail Rail

WPI Students take a tour of Mail Rail

The overall experience was fantastic, filled with opportunities and memories. We were able to visit and explore some of the most popular museums in London including the Natural History, Victorian and Albert, and Science museums. At these museums, we observed visitors to identify what they enjoyed and see how the set up can affect visitor engagement.

Nysa

Nysa at Last Post Coalbrookdale

We also had the pleasure of working with BPMA visitors. Getting to know those who enjoyed the BPMA’s work, and asking them for helpful insight into what they learned and what they think would improve the sites. Working at events and visiting the Last Post exhibition at Mansfield and Coalbrookdale was a thrilling experience; we not only learned about the exhibitions but also were able to test many different evaluation methods such as interview, surveys, creative writing/drawing activities and observations.

Shuyang

Shuyang with the postal uniform display

We gathered some informative and gratifying feedback, for example one visitor said she “…learned so much more about a city [she had] lived in for 40 years.” Others said that they “did not realize the extent of Post Office involvement in the First World War.” The feedback we gathered was helpful and greatly aided our research objectives.

Enjoying London

WPI Students enjoying London

Aside from gaining new knowledge about museum goers, as a team we were able to improve our professional writing skills, communicate with a broad range of people, and work efficiently in a group setting. This experience also enabled us to grow as young professionals; we believe this project has added to a foundation of what the working world is like.  Living in London was an experience of a lifetime; adapting and working in a different culture will enable us to adapt to all presented opportunities and continue to broaden our understanding of the world.

Thank you,

Angela, Nysa, Shuyang and George

After a break following the first trials of our 3D scanning project

After a break following the first trials of our 3D scanning project, work continued last week when Martin Devereux, Head of Digital, and Stuart, Philatelic, took three objects to UCL to be scanned by Mona Hess, our 3D specialist. 

These were no ordinary objects, however. Stuart, our philatelic archivist and I took a flintlock pistol used to guard mail coaches, a handstamp used to cancel mail carried by the first airmail trial in 1911, and an iconic plaster cast of Her Majesty the Queen, sculpted by Arnold Machin. The Machin cast is recognised around the world as it has appeared on UK stamps since 1967.

Handstamp getting scanned by the

Handstamp being scanned by the Arius 3D colour scanner.

Each of these items poses a serious challenge to current 3D digitisation techniques. Glossy surfaces and deep features mean that lasers do not work as effectively as with less shiny and less detailed subjects.

Mona spent over 3 hours scanning the plaster cast with the Arius 3D colour scanner, while Stuart and I, along with MSc student, Sarah Sifontes Duran, captured the geometry of the handstamp and flintlock pistol, using an infra-red scanner – a technique that Mona is pioneering. The aim of this work is to produce a set of techniques which can be combined quickly and at low-cost to produce accurate and detailed representations of objects in three dimensions.

Stuart carefully transporting the Machin cast.

Stuart carefully transporting the Machin cast.

Output of the Machin 3D scan.

Output of the Machin 3D scan.

Digitising the plaster cast of Her Majesty was the climax of the day and a highpoint for Mona. She has scanned many memorable objects over the years and the Machin cast is certainly a significant addition to her list.

Flintlock pistol being scanned.

Flintlock pistol being scanned.

Machin cast close-up.

Machin close-up.

Once the cast had been scanned, the remainder of the day saw the scanning of the flintlock pistol and handstamp using the Arius colour scanner.

Mona is working to refine the results of the trials and further work will be undertaken over the summer as the project moves forward.

-Martin Devereux, Head of Digital

Delivery by Design: Stamps in Antarctica at The Polar Museum, Cambridge

With a population of just 250, The British Antarctic Territory, which covers 660,000 square miles of Antarctica from offshore islands to the South Pole itself, doesn’t necessarily seem like somewhere that the postal service would need to operate. But, despite the low number of permanent residents, the Territory issues both its own postage stamps and coins and even has an Antarctic Postman, based in Port Stanley on the Falkland Islands, who visits the outlying research bases by ship.

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With such a fascinating story to tell, it’s no surprise that there is now an exhibition devoted to the postage stamps of this remote territory. Last Thursday The Polar Museum in Cambridge launched the captivating Delivery by Design: Stamps in Antarctica exhibition. With the assistance of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Scott Polar Research Institute the exhibition uses stamps, printing proofs and original artworks to shed light on this little known corner of the globe, from native wildlife including Emperor Penguins and Huskies to ships ploughing through ice and planes flying over the frozen sea, commemorating British expeditions to the Antarctic throughout history.

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The exhibition at The Polar Museum is a wonderful example of how stamps are much more than just a means of sending a letter from A to B. They are a window into history giving a snapshot of the social, cultural and design influences of any given period across every region of our planet. With every stamp from the Penny Black to the present day and all stamp artwork, both adopted and unadopted (including from such famous artists as Paul Nash, Terence Cuneo and David Gentleman) in our collections, we know that there are hundreds if not thousands of interesting stories just waiting to be told. It’s great to see exhibitions such as that at The Polar Museum bringing these stories into the public domain and I hope you will take the opportunity to pay it a visit.

Adrian Steel – Director

The exhibition will be running at The Polar Museum, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge until 6 September 2014. Entry is free and the museum is open 10-4 Tuesday to Saturday. www.spri.cam.ac.uk/museum