Tag Archives: airmail

Favourite archive item: original poster artwork

For Explore Your Archive week, Head of Archives and Records Management Vicky Parkinson introduces her favourite item from our archive…well at least her favourite of the week!

“How do you feel about us filming a short ‘soundbite’ of you talking about ‘your favourite item’ while you are at the Conference next week?” started the email from the Head of Public Affairs at Archives and Records Association (ARA).

“Why not!” I thought, I can put my media training to use, and so I started to think about what my favourite item in the archive is. When you have around two and a half miles of shelving filled with archival material, dating back to 1636, it’s pretty hard to pick one item that’s your favourite.

POST 109/365.

POST 109/365

It’s actually quite hard to choose just one item from an archive. The very nature of archives means you tend to consider them as series, rather than individual items. How do you single out one volume from a run of volumes containing cash accounts from the 17th century or one staff handbook from a series that contains over 700 volumes?(Side note: I did seriously consider choosing a cash book; the handwriting is beautiful and they can tell you a lot, not just how much money went in and out of the post office in any given year)

So maybe I should choose a series first, perhaps something I enjoy showing people when I do a tour of the archive? No doubt as to what that is, I love showing people our posters. Most people have hazy preconceptions of what will be in our archive before they come on a tour, and it’s fun to challenge those. Regular readers of our blog will know that we love the posters and will use them wherever we can to illustrate articles. What’s not to love about a series of posters that starts at the golden age of public relations?

Each poster is stunning in its own right, together they show the development of so many things: the use of PR in the Post Office, the changing services it provided, the issues that were important to the organisation (you just have to look at how many Post Early for Christmas campaigns there have been to realise what a big issue it is for the postal service every year), the development of design and the move to computerised design in the 1980s, to name a few. Watching people’s eyes light up when I open the draws and start bringing out the bright colourful posters reminds me what an amazing job I have.

As amazing as the posters are I love the artwork for the posters even more. In this age of technology it’s easy to take design for granted, one look at poster artwork reminds you what an amazing skill the designers had. You can see every brush stroke, see the pencil lines drawn to help keep lettering straight, see where they’ve stuck additional bits on, where there were fiddly bits that would have ruined the picture if they’d tried to paint in on directly. Unfortunately they’re also rather fragile, much more fragile than the posters, which means that we can’t handle them too much and so I don’t look at them as frequently and don’t know them as well.

POST 109/364

POST 109/364

Just before the ARA conference I took an artist down to the posters to give him some ideas of what we had, so that he could start thinking about how to engage a class of children in a project we were working together on. It was whilst preparing for this visit that I came across a wonderful piece of poster artwork (POST 109/158) and had a true wow moment.

POST 109/158

POST 109/158

We don’t have the poster for this, so this was the first time I had come across it. The colours pop in real life, and the text is bold. One of these days I will find the time to look through the records relating to poster design and see what I can find out about the artwork, and the artist, but the poster artwork itself stands on its own without any accompanying information, and little information on the poster itself. It shows the story of the GPO in the mid-1930s, and using graphic designers, it challenges the old fashioned art establishment, illustrating the pioneering go-getting nature of the GPO with its deliciously sleek airmail planes.

Up close picture of artwork for a poster. Artist: Ronald Watson POST 109-158

Up close picture of artwork for a poster. Artist: Ronald Watson POST 109-158

Ask me again in a few months time and I may very well have a different favourite item in the archive, that’s the joy of having two miles and a half of shelving containing records that document 378 years of postal history!

-Vicky Parkinson, Head of Archives and Records Management

 

Autumn Stampex 2014

IT’S BACK! On Wednesday 17 September, Stampex will open its doors once more at Business Design Centre. Entry is free, and we are delighted to have a stand at the show. Come visit us on:

  • Wed 17 September: 11.30am – 7pm
  • Thu 18 September: 10am – 6pm
  • Fri 19 September: 10am – 6pm
  • Sat 20 September: 10am – 5pm

Our stand will be situated at Gallery Bay 20. Gallery Bay 20 is immediately to the right of the stairway up from the main Mezzanine floor, half-way along the right-hand side.

The BPMA stand at Spring Stampex 2014

The BPMA stand at Spring Stampex 2014

We will be giving away FREE goodie bags to every visitor, including a limited edition postcard. We will also be sharing news about events and activities and will be available to answer questions and provide information on our forthcoming plans to open The Postal Museum.

crab

Free limited edition postcard available at Stampex: Poster advertising post card rates. Hass, Derrick. 1954 POST 110/1322

There will be a great selection of BPMA shop stock to purchase including a new Stampex presentation pack and limited edition Airmail First Day Covers.

scan

Stampex Autumn 2014 Presentation Pack

You can also browse our new Airmail range, full of great gift ideas for those near and far.

New banner

We will also have an exciting display marking 80 years of UK Inland Airmail, with facsimiles available of newspaper reports from 1934, documenting air mail trials via plane, and even rocket! We will also have a display marking the centenary of postage due stamps, first established in 1914.

Also available at the BPMA stand will be tickets to purchase for the BPMA evening talk taking place on Thursday 18 September, entitled ‘Postal Censorship during the First World War’ with Graham Mark. The talk is taking place on Thursday 18 September at 7pm, at the Phoenix Centre (next door to the BPMA), a 20 minute walk from the Business Design Centre. Light refreshments will be available from 6pm at the Phoenix Centre.

Innovation in the Air: 80 years of UK Inland Airmail

On August 20, the BPMA marked the 80th anniversary of UK Inland Airmail with the launch of a special commemorative Post & Go stamp, including a pictorial element for the first time. The stamp is available from the BPMA Post & Go machine at Freeling House. The underprint incorporates the airmail logo designed by Theyre Lee-Elliott in 1934 for use on Inland Airmail posters, flyers and labels, with the text “Inland Airmail 1934”. In a change to the currently available stamps the Machin head will feature on the Second Class as well as First Class denominations for the duration of the commemorative issue, replacing the previous Union Flag design.

Our Search Room foyer will be open throughout Stampex for those wishing to purchase Post & Go products. If you do visit the Post & Go machine at Freeling House, we would also encourage you to have a look at our slightly larger Inland Airmail exhibition, currently on display.

We look forward to seeing you both at Stampex and at Freeling House!

-Dominique Gardner, Exhibitions Officer

NEW EXHIBITION Innovation in the air: The 80th anniversary of inland airmail

20 August 2014 marks the 80th anniversary of UK inland airmail delivery. To mark this fascinating story we are hosting a new display in the BPMA Foyer and Search Room from 20 August to 20 October.

Alongside the display will be the chance to look through facsimile examples of newspaper reports from 1934; visitors can read first-hand accounts of the storm chaos that overshadowed the inaugural flight on 20 August. Evening newspaper headlines were quick to tell the public of the bumpy start to the service. Contemporary accounts from the time scream aloud ‘Britain’s Great Air-Mail Muddle’ and tell of the ‘Mail Planes In Gale Ordeal… Chairman of New Line ‘Bumped’ Through Roof’.

Airmail logo.

Airmail logo.

Alongside a discussion of the merits and limitations of the new airmail service, the display will also look at other unusual methods to deliver the post that were trialled around this time- namely the ultra-imaginative but ultimately unsuccessful rocket mail, which saw mail actually delivered in specially designed rockets.

Newspaper report and picture of Zucker’s rocket exploding on Scarp,  The Daily Telegraph, 1 August 1934.

Newspaper report and picture of Zucker’s rocket exploding on Scarp,
The Daily Telegraph, 1 August 1934.

Partly burnt items of mail, singed during the rocket explosions, can still be seen in our collection today.

‘How is the Post Office to make itself heard, to capture the interest and attention of the public, upon which there are already so many claims?’ - Sir Stephen Tallents, 1934

With the growing volume of letters sent by air came the idea of having special letter boxes for their collection. In 1930 the Post Office began painting pillar boxes to be used for airmail collections an ‘Air Force’ blue colour. The eye catching blue boxes promoted and advertised the new airmail service now available to the public. On display for the duration of the BPMA display will be a blue ‘Air Mail’ pillar box.

Our airmail pillar box.

Our airmail pillar box.

By 1934, the Post Office had become very conscious of design. A Public Relations department had been created under Sir Stephen Tallents. Theyre Lee- Elliott was commissioned to redesign labels, leaflets and posters especially for the new airmail service. Based upon stylised wings the new label was introduced on 25 July 1934. Just prior to that, on 17 May 1934, a new flag was authorised for aircraft carrying the Royal Mail.

Available alongside the display, from our Post & Go machine, will be a special commemorative Post & Go stamp, which will include a pictorial element for the first time. The underprint will incorporate the airmail logo designed by Theyre Lee-Elliott in 1934 for use on Inland Airmail posters, flyers and labels, with the text “Inland Airmail 1934”.

Check out our airmail shop range for first day covers, mugs, postcards and much more!

We will also be launching a Google Cultural Institute online exhibition on Wednesday exploring the stories of innovation in delivering the post. ‘Post Haste’ will look at the unusual and imaginative ways that have been used to transport the mail from cats to rockets and many more!

- Dominique Gardner, Exhibitions Officer

Instone Airline

Postcard advertising air parcel post (POST50/36)

Postcard advertising air parcel post (POST50/36)

Although naturally the collections of the BPMA focus overwhelmingly on the historical operations and administration of the Post Office and Royal Mail, we can occasionally offer a glimpse into the history of other companies who have had a past business relationship with the postal service. A good example of this is when we recently had the pleasure of a visit from Mr. Martin Instone. He was hoping to see a notice we hold in our collection dating from 1922, advertising the Parcel Post service to Paris and Brussels operated by Instone Airline (POST 50/36, below). He also very kindly gave us a brief history of his ancestors’ company.

Instone Airline, originally the ‘Aerial Transport Department’ of S. Instone & Co., was owned by the Instone brothers (Samuel, Theodore, Alfred and Gustave). The Instones were ship owners and merchants who had interests in shipping, trading and industries such as coal mining. After World War One, communications between European countries were slow to return to pre-war standards. This led to delays in the delivery of bills of lading and other documents, which in turn meant the unloading of ships was often delayed. To solve this problem, S. Instone & Co. purchased a de Havilland DH4 plane, initially used to transport company documents, goods and employees from Cardiff via London to Brussels – the plane’s first flight was on 13th October 1919.

“The City of London” being loaded up with Royal Mail items and goods for same day delivery to Paris (image copyright © Martin Instone)

“The City of London” being loaded up with Royal Mail items and goods for same day delivery to Paris (image copyright © Martin Instone)

The Instones soon realised they had the opportunity to offer a transport facility for non-company personnel and goods, and, on purchasing two further aircraft in early 1920, formed Instone Airline. It is believed to be the first airline to introduce uniforms for its pilots and staff, and was also the first to transport a racehorse!

Instone Airlines agreed a contract with Royal Mail for the transportation of letters and parcels between London, Paris and Brussels, and also opened routes between these cities and Cologne and Prague. By 1924, the company ran a fleet of eight aircraft from the airport at Croydon.

In 1924, the British government amalgamated Instone Airline with a number of other small airlines to form Imperial Airways, of which Sir Samuel Instone was a director. Imperial became the British Oversees Airways Corporation (BOAC) in 1940, and in 1977 merged with British European Airways Corporation (BEA) to form today’s British Airways.

Instone Air Line service timetable (image copyright © Martin Instone)

Instone Airline service timetable (image copyright © Martin Instone)

As I’ve shown, even if you’re not undertaking direct research into postal history, it may be worth checking out our catalogue which may throw up something of interest. Along with all the postal history records you’d expect us to hold, there is information on BOAC, British Telecom (until BT separated from the Post Office in the 1980s, telecommunications came under the remit of the PO), Unilever, Vodafone, the Co-operative and many other businesses and organisations that had a relationship with the UK’s postal services. Have a look at our catalogue at http://www.postalheritage.org.uk to see what you can find.

- Robin Sampson, Archives & Records Assistant (with thanks to Martin Instone).

The inaugural regular air mail service from England to Australia, December 1934

The following article was written by John Crowe, who recently visited the Royal Mail Archive to research the inaugural regular weekly service from England to Australia, and in particular the ceremony which took place at Croydon Aerodrome on Saturday 8th December 1934…

The ceremony took place in front of the HP 42 “Hengist” and was presided over by the Secretary of State for Air, Lord Londonderry. He had received mail for despatch to Australia from their majesties the King and Queen and HRH the Prince of Wales. He handed the mail to the Postmaster General, Sir Kingsley Wood, who stamped it with a special Croydon Aerodrome steel date stamp with an ivory and silver handle. This special date-stamp is slightly smaller than the normal Croydon Aerodrome cancel with a diameter of 24 mm, compared with 26 mm for the normal date-stamp. The royal letters were then put in a blue silk bag which was handed to Sir Eric Geddes, the chairman of Imperial Airways, and he in turn handed it to the pilot of the aircraft.

Tractors towing Hengist out of the Imperial Airways’ hangar at Croydon, prior to the first service to Australia. (POST 118/201)

Tractors towing Hengist out of the Imperial Airways’ hangar at Croydon, prior to the first service to Australia. (POST 118/201)

A cover addressed to the Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of Australia, the Rt. Hon. J.A. Lyons, received the same treatment as the royal letters with the special date-stamp. The cover has an Air Ministry cachet and beneath it the cachet PRIME MINISTER.

Another cover which received the royal treatment together with the letter which was enclosed, are below. The letter is from the Postmaster General, Sir Kingsley Wood, to his opposite number in Australia. The Commonwealth Postmaster General at the time was Senator the Hon. Alexander John McLachlan.

Cover addressed to The Postmaster General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

Cover addressed to The Postmaster General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

Letter addressed to The Postmaster General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

Letter addressed to The Postmaster General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

I purchased the letter and cover in 2002 from Maurice Porter. I do not know how it first came into the public domain. Presumably, the Commonwealth Postmaster retained it as a personal item and disposed of it at some later date. Maurice has told me that he purchased it in the Harmer’s sale of the late Alex Newall’s collection. He thinks Alex might have acquired it through one of his FISA connections.

Below is a cover which was carried on the inaugural flight and which was cancelled with the normal Croydon Aerodrome date-stamp. It was signed later (January 1935) by the Postmaster General, Sir Kingsley Wood.

A cover carried on the inaugural flight.

A cover carried on the inaugural flight.

This is the special steel, Croydon Aerodrome datestamp with an ivory and silver handle.

Special Croydon Aerodrome datestamp.

Special Croydon Aerodrome datestamp.

The story of the ivory and silver hand-stamp is an interesting one. It appears that after Sir Kingsley Wood had stamped the VIP mail the hand-stamp was sent with the mail to the Postmaster General of Australia, probably in the blue silk bag, to be retained as a souvenir.

First Australian Air Mail Bag, Dec 1934 (POST 118/205)

First Australian Air Mail Bag, Dec 1934 (POST 118/205)

The hand-stamp remained in Australia, presumably in the possession of the Australian postal archive in Melbourne, until 1984. In that year the curator of the National Postal Museum, as it then was, visited Melbourne to attend the philatelic exhibition known as “Ausipex”. As a result of his visit the hand-stamp was returned to the UK where it can be viewed, by appointment, at the Royal Mail Archive. The silver band around the middle of the hand-stamp reads “First England to Australia/ Air Mail/ 8th Dec 1934” and the metal plate on the top of the box reads “FIRST/ENGLAND TO AUSTRALIA/AIR MAIL/ 8TH DECEMBER 1934”.

John Crowe examines the handstamp during his visit to the Royal Mail Archive.

John Crowe examines the handstamp during his visit to the Royal Mail Archive.

The handstamp.

The handstamp.

Go to Flickr to see images of the First Australian Air Mail.

Acknowledgements

John Crowe thanks Julian Stray (Curator) and Barry Attoe (Search Room Manager) of the BPMA for their help in viewing the hand-stamp; also Stan Wheatcroft whose earlier work is the basis for much of this article.

BPMA thanks John Crowe and Peter Winget for allowing us to publish this article on our blog.

Overseas mails

In the lead-up to Christmas we are sharing with you 12 Posters of Christmas, a dozen classic postal posters from the Royal Mail Archive. Today’s is…

Poster advertising final posting dates for overseas Christmas mail, designed by Tilley, September 1966. (POST 110/3034)

Poster advertising final posting dates for overseas Christmas mail, designed by Tilley, September 1966. (POST 110/3034)

This poster first appeared in September 1966 and as with other long, landscape posters would have been displayed on to the side of small Morris post vans. The designer Tilley has created a colourful scene to promote the list of Christmas posting dates available at post offices. A dolphin representing sea (or surface) mail holds a copy of the list in its mouth, while a bird representing airmail holds a copy in its beak.

These days the public are more likely to use the internet to find out the last posting dates. The Royal Mail website lists the dates for 2012 here: http://www.royalmail.com/greetings.

Get your Christmas presents from our online shop. Order before 18 December for delivery within the UK.

Christmas airmail

In the lead-up to Christmas we are sharing with you 12 Posters of Christmas, a dozen classic postal posters from the Royal Mail Archive. Today’s is…

Poster advertising Christmas air mail services; featuring a flying Father Christmas with wings made out of Air Mail stickers, designed by Dick Negus and Philip Sharland, 1962. (POST 110/4254)

Poster advertising Christmas air mail services; featuring a flying Father Christmas with wings made out of Air Mail stickers, designed by Dick Negus and Philip Sharland, 1962. (POST 110/4254)

This poster from 1962 gives the last posting dates for Christmas mail sent by airmail in that year. Airmail is usually associated with international mail services but after the Second World War the Post Office began to use scheduled inland flights to carry mail between major centres.

Since 1979 Royal Mail has developed an inland network of nightly flights between provincial centres. Its national air network, Skynet, ensures millions of letters reach their destination the day after posting. Thanks to Skynet some of your Christmas cards and parcels will have gone by air for part of their journey without the need for an airmail sticker.

If Skynet sounds a bit Terminator and not as fun as this Father Christmas with angel wings of airmail stickers, we can only apologise.