New Exhibition: Unstitching the Uniform

A new exhibition entitled ‘Unstitching the Uniform’ is now open in our Search Room, inspired by, and including objects from, our recent community project with The Amies.  You may remember our Community Learning Officer, Hannah Clipson, has previously written about our work with this group of ten trafficked women brought together by PAN Arts and The Poppy Project, an organisation providing support, advocacy and accommodation for trafficked women.

During the project, the group investigated the design history of the postal service; a particular favourite focus became the huge variety of ever-changing uniforms worn by postal workers. Inspired by their own experiences and the objects and stories explored, the group responded in creative ways, including sewing their own versions of key uniform items from our collection, and collaborating with the artist Ella Phillips from October Gallery and textiles facilitator Susie Foster. It is this work that formed the inspiration and basis for the ‘Unstitching the Uniform’ exhibition.

The Amies together, © Brendan Foster Photography

The Amies together

From cloth caps to hessian bags, uniform has always been designed for durability, protection and identification and this theme is explored throughout the exhibition using original objects from BPMA’s collection such as caps, badges and telegram pouches. Also featured are those workers who pioneered a change in uniform, from Jean Cameron’s call for postwomen’s trousers to Mr Sant Singh Saneet’s successful campaign for the turban to become an accepted item of headgear.

Female horse and cart drivers, First World War, POST 118

Female horse and cart drivers in uniform, First World War (POST 118)

Alongside the objects and archival images are art installations by Ella Phillips and Susie Foster. Susie has created a jacket and skirt inspired by both the postwoman’s uniform and the design work of The Amies during workshop sessions. Ella charts the progress of The Amies throughout the project, telling some of their remarkable stories. Included on display is a pouch sewn by one of group, similar to one used by a Post Office telegram messenger boy.

Admiring some handiwork

Admiring some handiwork

The Amies at work

The Amies at work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We do hope you’ll come along to see this exhibition during our opening hours to follow The Amies on their journey, unravelling stories held within our collection, and to see the work that they inspired.

For more information about other amazing social enterprises involving the Amies group, visit www.flowerpress.org.

-Emma Harper, Exhibitions Officer

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