Author Archives: Sally Sculthorpe

Campaign! An exhibition curated by Langley Academy students.

Emily Llewellyn,  a Year 12 student at Langley Academy and member of their Museum Council explains how she used a story from the BPMA collection in a student-led exhibition.

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Campaign! Langley Academy

My school, The Langley Academy in Slough, which is the UK’s first school with a focus in Museum Learning, recently curated an exhibition called Campaign! as part of our Museum Learning term. 

The British Postal Museum were kind enough to allow us to include some of their images in the exhibition.  This included a photograph on display in the Suffragette case. The photograph shows two women who became known as “human letters” after they posted themselves to Downing Street in an attempt to personally deliver a message to the Prime Minister.

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The photo on display alongside an umbrella belonging to Nancy Astor, the first female MP who also lived locally to Slough.

The exhibition was curated by the Museum Team and Year 12 Creative writing students. The exhibition covered multiple popular campaigns throughout history including Suffragettes, the Magna Carta, Child Rights, Human Rights, LGBTQ Rights and Slavery.

Read more about the Suffragette human letters.

New FREE Learning Resource for Key Stages 1-3

It has been 175 years since the invention of the world’s first postage stamp – the Penny Black. Pop It In the Post is a new FREE downloadable learning package that reveals how this little piece of paper changed the way people communicated forever.

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JUST A PENNY! 

In 1840 the idea that a letter could be sent anywhere in Britain for just one penny was revolutionary. For the first time ordinary people could afford to send letters, and the effect was as wide reaching as the introduction of the Internet.

Pop It In The Post supports learning across the curriculum and includes:

  • A downloadable learning resource containing lesson plans, teacher’s notes, image galleries and Powerpoints for whiteboards
  • Over 100 activity ideas, using real archival documents, photos, maps and museum objects to support subjects including Literacy, Maths, Science and Art and Design.
  • A fun animated interactive game for pupils to play and explore the story of the Penny Black
  • A short film introducing pupils to Rowland Hill, the social reformer who led the campaign for letters to cost just a penny who explains how his big idea changed the world.

This learning package was sponsored by Royal Mail Group

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Teachers! Review our First World War learning resource to win free copies for your school

We’re looking for Primary and Secondary teachers to review our new FREE First World War learning resource for Key Stages 1 – 3. In return for your time we’ll enter you into a prize draw to win copies of the resource for your school.

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Last Post brings the story of the postal service in the First World War to life in your classroom. Wartime characters guide your pupils through the different topics. From the importance of female postal workers on the Home Front, to the telegram messenger boys tasked with delivering news of the fallen, pupils will discover how mail was sent to soldiers and find out about the sacrifices made by the Post Office Rifles regiment on the Front Line.

Take a sneak peek inside.

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The resource contains:

• Lesson plans
• Teacher’s notes
• Over 100 activity ideas
• Image galleries
• PowerPoints for whiteboards

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Download our learning resource

Review our learning resource.

If you have any questions about Last Post email learning@postalheritage.org.uk

Victorian Christmas workshops at Westminster Abbey

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For the past two weeks I’ve been busy delivering Victorian Christmas workshops for schools in the awe-inspiring Westminster Abbey.

The Christmas workshops follow on from last year’s successful partnership with the Westminster Abbey Education team. This year we were also joined by the Dickens Museum. The three organisations worked together to develop festive workshops for primary schools across London.

Each class took part in two activities. They toured Westminster Abbey and participated in telling the Christian Nativity story by taking on the role of characters including shepherds, the three Wise people and Mary and Joseph.

The second activity was co-led by the BPMA and Dickens Museum. They found out about two famous Victorians who are both buried in Westminster Abbey – Rowland Hill, inventor of the Penny Black stamp and Charles Dickens, author of among other books, A Christmas Carol.

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Another connection is that the world’s first commercially produced Christmas card was made in 1843, the same year as A Christmas Carol was published.

To finish their visit students made a Christmas card, based on a Victorian toy shop.

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Lots of festive fun was had by all!

Guest blog: Arts Award students meet Danny Martin, contemporary war poet

Meet our latest guest bloggers Aldis and Max. Two more 'Communicating Conflict' Arts Award students from Haverstock School.

Meet our latest guest bloggers Aldis and Max. Two more ‘Communicating Conflict’ Arts Award students from Haverstock School.

Last week, the students were visited by Danny Martin, a former soldier and war poet, who now works as an English teacher. 

Here’s what Aldis and Max had to say about Danny’s visit:

Danny’s life is one of the most inspiring anyone could ever hear about. It really made us think about the life of a soldier during war and the hardships that they face. Death and injury haunt them every day. Danny’s inspiration for becoming a soldier was when he was around the same age as us when he joined the army cadets.

Danny first started writing poetry after leaving the army whilst studying for a Creative Writing degree in Liverpool. His poems were published in a book of contemporary war poetry called Heroes.

Danny reading his poem: 'The Haddock of Mass Destruction'

Danny reading his poem: ‘The Haddock of Mass Destruction’

Danny’s poem expresses war differently to what we believe it is like. It really made us think about our lives and how we could change them for the better. Danny describes the commodities of war as pain and suffering instead of being a hero and a patriot.

War poet Danny Martin in action

War poet Danny Martin in action

Aldis and Max were very inspired by Danny’s visit:

We learnt the true side of the story, the kind of thing that we don’t hear on the TV. We learnt the consequences of joining the army. We also learnt that all soldiers have their own different stories of army life however others think they all are the same.

A huge thank you to Danny for visiting Haverstock School. Look out for more from our guest bloggers as they continue to work with project poet Joelle Taylor to develop their own poems in response to the First World War stories in the BPMA collection.

Guest blog: Communicating Conflict Arts Award students

Meet guest bloggers Samiah and Shaima. Two of our Communicating Conflict Arts Award students from Haverstock School.

Meet Samiah and Shaima - two students from Haverstock School.

Meet Samiah and Shaima – two students from Haverstock School.

The Arts Award students recently participated in two workshops with Big Wheel Theatre Company. Here’s what Samiah and Shaima had to say about their experiences.

We are extremely lucky to be taking part in this Arts Award. Last week we were very fortunate to take part in a theatre workshop called ‘Meaning in the Mud’ about poems that were written during the First World War.

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Arts Award students with Roland and George from the Big Wheel Theatre Company.

After the poetry workshop, Roland and George visited us in class to develop our knowledge of the Post Office Rifles. We learnt about three soldiers named Sergeant Alfred Knight, Captain Home Peel and Rifleman Harry Brown. We looked at letters that were sent to Harry Brown’s mother.

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Students discover the story of Post Office Rifle, Harry Brown.

Harry Brown was a Rifleman who was involved in a fierce, bloody, brutal battle at Nieuport Les Bains. When his mother asked to know what happened to her son she received a letter from the Red Cross stating they did not know the whereabouts of her dear son. We later found out, after reading another letter, that he was captured and taken to a prisoner of war camp. This letter was the last letter she ever received from her son. He died at the prisoner of war camp from “inflammation of the lungs”.

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Original letter from the Central Prisoners of War Committee to Harry Brown’s mother.

Roland spoke to us in character about the battlefield and all the tactics used during this horrendous time. We were told about the battle of Wurst Farm Ridge. In this battle we learnt that Post Office Rifle Sergeant Alfred Knight was awarded the Victoria Cross for his leadership and bravery.

We wrote messages of remembrance for the Post Office Rifles.

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Roland and George from Big Wheel Theatre Company took these messages to Ypres and left them at the Post Office Rifles memorial. They are performing their Meaning in the Mud workshop in Belgian schools.

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Thanks to Samiah and Shaima for this fantastic blog. Keep an eye out for more from our Haverstock School Arts Award students as the project progresses.