NEW STAMPS: Bridges

The Bridges stamp issue celebrates the leaps in engineering that have seen the UK’s bridges evolve from humble stone crossings, such as Tarr Steps, to dramatic symbolic landmarks conceived by progressive architects, such as the Peace Bridge.

Tees Transporter Bridge, 1st class.

Tees Transporter Bridge, 1st class.

Tarr Steps, 1st class.

Tarr Steps, 1st class.

Royal Border Bridge, 1st class.

Royal Border Bridge, 1st class.

Row Bridge, 1st class.

Row Bridge, 1st class.

Pulteney Bridge, 1st class.

Pulteney Bridge, 1st class.

Peace Bridge, 1st class.

Peace Bridge, 1st class.

Menai Suspension Bridge, 1st class.

Menai Suspension Bridge, 1st class.

Humber Bridge, 1st class.

Humber Bridge, 1st class.

High Level Bridge, 1st class.

High Level Bridge, 1st class.

Graigellachie Bridge, 1st class.

Graigellachie Bridge, 1st class.

British Bridges have made an appearance on stamps before. One issue from 1968 featured the Tarr Steps, Aberfeldy Bridge, Menai Bridge and M4 Viaduct.

1968_3497_l

In this image below you can see Stamp designer Jeffery Matthews working on the design for the 4d Tarr Steps stamp. He also designed the 1s 9d stamp, and the Presentation Pack and First Day Cover for this issue.

Stamp designer Jeffery Matthews at work on the ‘British Bridges’ (1868) issue

Stamp designer Jeffery Matthews at work on the ‘British Bridges’ (1868) issue

Many other designs were submitted by other designers, including David Gentleman. However, only four were selected for the final issue.

t

The stamps are available online by phone on 03457 641 641 and in 8,000 Post Offices throughout the UK. Stamps can be bought individually or as a set in a Presentation Pack.

Exploring 3D technologies at the BPMA

The last 12 months have been exciting for the Digital team here at the BPMA. Our Share Academy/London Museums Group funded project, From Vault to View, which partnered us with Mona Hess from UCL’s Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering Department, has given us both a lot to do and to think about. The project has now come to an end, but it has increased the knowledge we now have of 3D technologies, and encouraged us to do much more.

rtf

George V Die for striking leads. 1½d postage British Empire Exhibition, 1925

The aim of the project was to test different methods of capturing objects in 3D. Working with our little-viewed objects, Mona tried a variety of techniques to see what would produce good 3D models and what wouldn’t. The objects chosen posed real challenges: many were made of bright metals, which makes them difficult to capture using laser scanning or photogrammetry techniques; some were complex shapes, such as a flintlock pistol; while others had such a lack of detail making them difficult to measure and recreate as 3D computer models.

So what did we get out of it? Before the project we knew very little about how 3D

imaging worked. We felt the buzz around these technologies, such as 3D printing, but had little idea of how these things were created or how they might be used. All we really knew was that we had a rich treasure of 3D objects that no-one could really access physically in a satisfactory way.

By the end of the project, the BPMA had purchased photogrammetry software which has enabled us to try 3D imaging for ourselves – and the results are extremely promising. These techniques can be learnt by our staff and employed to create 3D models of items in the museum collection for exploration by the public.

This new-found knowledge, though still fairly elementary, has given us confidence to explore other uses for 3D imaging. In December 3D experts, ScanLab Projects, spent a week scanning the work depot, platforms and tunnels of Mail Rail which we will be opening to the public in 2016 as part of our plans for The Postal Museum. The results are truly astounding and we hope to show them in the near future.

Scanner capturing Mount Pleasant platform

Scanner capturing Mount Pleasant platform

Beyond all this, the project has given us an opportunity to revisit the objects and see them afresh. Although we weren’t able to obtain good 3D models of objects such as the large printing plates and the rollers, we did get excellent images of a number of dies using a technique known as Reflectance Transformation Imaging [RTI]. We also obtained an excellent laser-scanned 3D model of the Machin cast of Queen Elizabeth II – a truly unique and iconic object. The fruits of these experiments will eventually be made available via our website and online catalogue as we integrate the technology.

Plaster head of HM the Queen made by Arnold Machin for new definitive issue of stamps, third version (POST 118/5373)

Plaster head of HM the Queen made by Arnold Machin for new definitive issue of stamps, third version (POST 118/5373)

-Martin Devereux, Head of Digital

Dear Amie

At the BPMA we regularly work with local community groups, engaging them with our collection and listening to their stories. The outcome is always rewarding, but sometimes the way these groups interpret our collections is truly heart-warming. The BPMA Community Learning Officer, Hannah Clipson, tells us about her experience working with a group of 10 trafficked women known as the Amies.

During the summer of 2014 I spent 12 weeks working with the Amies on a project run in partnership with the October Gallery to investigate the design history of the postal service. These women are of diverse nationalities and ages; brought together by PAN Arts, a London based Arts Company, and The Poppy Project, an organisation providing support, advocacy and accommodation for trafficked women, and as such had a wide range of experiences and outlooks.

Over the course of the 12 weeks we looked at the changing uniforms of postal workers, the process of stamp design, the poster collection and mail art.

Examples of mail art from the BPMA collections

Examples of mail art from the BPMA collections

Inspired by their own experiences and the objects and stories explored in the BPMA collections, the group responded in creative ways, guided by the artist Ella Phillips from October Gallery. We designed our own stamp artwork, sent our own mail art through the post and they sent letters to family and friends, some examples of which you can see below. In addition, each participant had their own sketch book that they could add to during the workshops and in their own time.

Some of the work created by the Amies

Some of the work created by the Amies

Dear Amie exceeded our expectations; not only did it facilitate a range of positive outcomes for the participants but it also proved invaluable to the BPMA. One of the participants described her pride in having created positive experiences and a new life for herself and there was an eagerness to develop a second phase of the project in 2015. For this the women decided they’d like to create a textile output which will be displayed in our brand new Postal Museum, due to open in 2016.

Stamp artwork created by the group

One of the Amies design for a stamp showing things important to her

For the BPMA we learned some extremely valuable lessons and gained some remarkable stories of what the postal service means to different people. The level of engagement showed us the true potential of our collection and the diverse ways in which it can be used to inspire a wide range of audiences. The postal theme resonated with the women in a way that we could not have imagined. For most of them, sending a letter to loved ones had been a lifeline through extremely difficult circumstances. Recollection of these memories, stimulated through the exploration of BPMA material, led to a fascinating and unexpected reinterpretation of some of our objects and the discovery of some truly remarkable, personal stories. It reinforced to us that our collection can be interpreted in meaningful, personal ways and act as a catalyst to uncovering touching stories such as those of the Amies.

NEW STAMPS: Inventive Britain

The United Kingdom has a long and rich history as an inventive nation. The Inventive Britain stamp issue celebrates this vital and creative aspect of the national character with eight key inventions of the past century in a range of disciplines and applications, from materials to medicine.

Carbon Fibre, £1.28.

Carbon Fibre, £1.28.

Catseyes, 81p.

Catseyes, 81p.

Colossus, 1st class.

Colossus, 1st class.

 DNA Sequencing, £1.47.

DNA Sequencing, £1.47.

Fibre Optics, 81p.

Fibre Optics, 81p.

 i-Limb, £1.47.

i-Limb, £1.47.

Stainless Steel, £1.28.

Stainless Steel, £1.28.

Word Wide Web, 1st class.

Word Wide Web, 1st class.

The stamps are available online by phone on 03457 641 641 and in 8,000 Post Offices throughout the UK. Stamps can be bought individually or as a set in a Presentation Pack for £6.90.

Spring Stampex 2015

Spring Stampex is just around the corner and will return to the Business Design Centre on Wednesday 18 February. Admission is FREE and we are delighted to once again have a stand at the show with the Friends of the BPMA.

stampexlogo

You can find us at stand 102A on the Village Green at Ground Floor level.

The opening times are:

  • Wednesday 18 February 11:30 – 19:00
  • Thursday 19 February 10:00 – 18:00
  • Friday 20 February 10:00 – 18:00
  • Saturday 21 February 10:00 – 17:00

BPMA Director Adrian Steel will be giving a presentation on the development of the Postal Museum at the Business Design Centre at 13.00 on Thursday 19 February as part of the GBPS Diamond Jubilee Festival.  

Limited Edition Postcard featuring the poster ‘79,242 Postmen’. Mar 1939. Poster artist: Grant, Duncan.

Limited Edition Postcard featuring the poster ‘79,242 Postmen’. Mar 1939. Poster artist: Grant, Duncan.

We will be giving away FREE goodie bags to visitors, including a limited edition postcard produced especially for Stampex. Staff will also be available to answer questions and provide information on our forthcoming plans to open The Postal Museum, as well as sharing news about our upcoming events and activities.

Ahead of the forthcoming BPMA exhibition ‘Pop it in the Post’  - opening on 28 March at Islington Museum – we will be marking the bicentenary of the birth of novelist, and pillar box pioneer Anthony Trollope,. Do also go along to our Freeling House Foyer and take a look at the 1853 Channel Islands pillar box- one of the oldest in the world.

Queen Victoria Channel Islands Pillar Box originally from Guernsey in the Channel Islands OB1996.653

Queen Victoria Channel Islands Pillar Box originally from Guernsey in the Channel Islands OB1996.653

The display will also include our ‘People’s Post’ activity where visitors can come and share their memories of the postal service; we’ll be asking a prompt question every day, so pop in and have a chat with us – we love a good story here at BPMA!

As usual, there will be a great selection of BPMA shop products to purchase and this will include Post & Go products and our popular homeware range. Please note that the Trollope products will be unavailable on the morning of the Wednesday 18th.

Trollope 2015 Presentation Pack

We look forward to seeing you both at Stampex and at Freeling House!

Sarah Jenkins – Fundraising Events Officer

My Favourite Objects: Birdcage Valentine

More of a celebrator of Anna Howard Shaw Day than Valentine’s Day on 14 February, I never really spent much time down the card aisle hunting for the perfect valentine. That was until I took a journey through the valentines section of our archive.

Boxes and boxes full of Valentines

Boxes and boxes full of Valentines

We have nearly 1000 individual valentines in our collection spanning from the oldest in 1790 to ones as recent as 1996. As you can see in the picture above, they fill the shelves from floor to ceiling! One of the runner’s up for my favourite object was a Vinegar Valentine. You can’t help but be in shock by the rude (and downright nasty) nature of these. Just take a look at the following transformation card.

vinegar

My favourite object is a much more humbling valentine of a birdcage from 1817. It doesn’t look like your traditional valentine with hearts and love sprawled across it, and from the picture below it doesn’t look like anything too special.

Birdcage valentine (OB1995.49)

Birdcage valentine (OB1995.49)

However, the image above really doesn’t do it any justice through! In the centre is a string to pull. We haven’t tried to open it for quite some time, so after a bit of a pep talk Curator Emma demonstrated how the card works for me and now with you!

output_JR4KIK

Nearly 200 years old, this card is beautifully illustrated with the bird on the front and the two little mice on the inside. Way before laser cutting, the detailed cuts that form the cage were done by hand. Valentines sent during the 19th century, apart from Vinegar Valentines, were usually handmade mementos of affection – a lot of time was spent making these cards. This is why the Valentine Birdcage is my favourite object, because of its individual nature. It isn’t a generic card on the shelf but made specifically for the receiver. In other words, the admiration for the receiver is in the details NOT in the number of pink hearts.

What’s the best valentine you ever received or sent? We would love to see it!  Tweet us @postalheritage or send us an email at peoplespost@postalheritage.org.uk.

See even more valentines on our new online exhibition.

-Rachel Kasbohm, Digital Media Manager

 

Make your own Victorian Inspired Valentine’s Card

Victorian Valentine’s The popularity of sending Valentine’s cards greatly increased in the Victorian period, thanks, in part, to the introduction of the Penny Post. Victorian Valentine’s cards were often made of a number of different  materials, including lace, fringing, fabric and even human hair, which were layered, one on top of the other, much like a scrap book. Pictures of flowers were popular, as were images of Cupid and hearts. Victorian cards were a lot smaller than those generally on sale today and came in lots of different shapes. Some cards even had elaborate or novelty features like pop ups, music, scent and mechanical components.

'To My Valentine' Valentine Card c. 1890

‘To My Valentine’ Valentine Card c. 1890

Make your own Here are some beautiful images from Victorian Valentine’s cards in the BPMA’s collection for you to print out, cut out and use to create your very own Victorian inspired Valentine’s card. You could include your own photographs, sketches or memontos to make the cards really personal. 1 2 3 4

22  21 15

710

We would love to see how your cards turn out or hear about any interesting cards you’ve sent or received yourself! Tweet us @postalheritage or send us an email at peoplespost@postalheritage.org.uk. -Joanna Espin, Curator