Tag Archives: chain testing works

BPMA New Centre project receives grant from Heritage Lottery Fund

by Jo Sullivan, Project Officer: New Centre Project 

BPMA’s project to create a new Postal Museum & Archive on the Churchward Village site in Swindon recently received a piece of exciting news as the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) confirmed our first round pass for a grant of £2,617,800, including development funding of £117,800.

Architect's design for the New Centre main entrance

Architect's design for the New Centre main entrance

The first-round pass means that we can begin the development stage of the project and work up detailed proposals ahead of a round two application in 2011. In a tough funding climate, and against unprecedented competition, our project to move our fascinating collections into a new, accessible and permanent home has taken a step closer to becoming a reality.

The HLF was established in the United Kingdom under the National Lottery Act 1993. From museums, parks and historic places to archaeology, the natural environment and cultural traditions, the HLF provides grants to support all aspects of the UK’s diverse heritage. Since 1994 the HLF has supported more than 33,900 projects allocating £4.4billion across the UK.

What the New Centre gallery might look like

What the New Centre gallery might look like

The BPMA is in good company in the South West. In March this year the HLF gave the green light to Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum to work up plans to create a new gallery revealing the history and archaeology of the Salisbury and surrounding area.

Over the years other grants in the South West have varied in size and scope from the £17 million awarded to the National Maritime Museum, Falmouth, to £295,000 awarded to the University of Bristol to ‘release’ Britain’s oldest dinosaur after 210 million years of being entombed in rock.

Chain Testing Machinery from the railway era within the proposed New Centre building

Chain Testing Machinery from the railway era within the proposed New Centre building

Whilst Swindon has been recognised by the HLF as being a priority area it is certainly not lacking in culturally rich attractions. We look forward to developing mutually beneficial relationships with the existing group of cultural organisations based on the Churchward Village site: English Heritage, the National Trust and STEAM, Museum of the Great Western Railway.

Also it’s not just museums moving to Swindon as on 24th March 2010 it was announced that Swindon is now headquarters for Britain’s first national space agency. As well as the United Kingdom Space Agency (UKSA), Swindon is also home to the two main space funding bodies — the Science and Technology Facilities Council and the Natural Environment Research Council.

Find out more about the New Centre project on our website.

History of the Great Western Railway site – BPMA’s future new home

Swindon is largest town in Wiltshire with a population over 170,000.  However, before 1840 Swindon was a market town serving the surrounding dairy farms with fewer than 2500 inhabitants.  Its growth and population boom can be seen as a direct result of Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s decision to choose Swindon as the site for the railway works of the Great Western Railway (GWR).

At its peak in the mid 20th the railway works were employing over 14, 000 and the works stretched for 2.4 km.  The railways were nationalised in 1948, and GWR became British Rail Western Region and the works became part of British Rail Engineering under the 1960 Transport Act.  In 1960 the Evening Star became the last steam locomotive built for British Rail. The site closed on 27th March 1986.  In the 1984 the historic parts of the site were designated Grade 2* or Grade 2.   There was redevelopment of the site in the 1990’s and English Heritage was the first new tenant in 1994.

An aerial view of the former Chain Testing House, Swindon - soon to be home to the BPMA

An aerial view of the former Chain Testing House, Swindon - soon to be home to the BPMA

Early History

By the end of 1832, there was commercial pressure for a rail link from Bristol (and the Atlantics) to London and a committee to investigate the matter was formed of prominent Bristol merchants.  The ‘Committee of Deputies’ met in July 1833 and agreed that the way forward was to form a company and obtain and Act of Parliament.   However, the GWR Railway Bill took some further two years to pass due to the opposition of some local landowners on the route.

The reason why Swindon was chosen to be the heart of the mid 19th railway expansion was actually a simple matter of geography. The line passing through Swindon was seen as ideal due to the lie of the land and it was the straightest route. The railway works were located in the Vale of the White Horse to the north of the old market town.  It is still often referred to as Swindon New Town.

It was Daniel Gooch, GWR’s first chief engineer and later Chairman, who was instrumental in the decision to select Swindon as the site. In 1840 Gooch wrote to Brunel suggesting Swindon as the most suitable site for the engine shed.  It was agreed in 1840.  Works began on the building of the site in 1841 which opened in January 1843. There were three building stages and work continued until 1849 with only minor additions to the site made thereafter.

More than just a job

Swindon had no history of heavy industrial labour, and so the workforce would need to be imported.  This meant that one of the first requirements of the site was accommodation for the workforce.  Brunel was responsible for the design of the railway village.  Most of the terraced stone houses built to the south of the site still stand today. They are perceived as excellent early example of a model village development for an industrial workforce.  They were planned as a self-contained community; the intention was to provide all the necessary facilities for what the Victorians perceived a ‘decent’ life.  The Swindon Mechanics Institute, set up for the purpose of offering an educational and social outlet for the railway workers had already outgrown the use of the rooms within the factories and in 1855 the Swindon Mechanics Institution opened in the heart of the railway village.

 In fact, the late 1860s and early 1870s saw many progressive actions that would help improve the lives of the workers on site including a hospital and from 1868 there was fresh drinking water from the Swindon Water Company and sewage disposal in 1872.

The BPMA in Swindon

Chain testing equipment, which will be a feature of the BPMA's new home

Chain testing equipment, which will be a feature of the BPMA's new home

The Chain Testing House was built in 1873.  The Testing house – or Shop 17 as it was known – tested iron, steel, copper and rope for use on the railways.  At its peak in the 1950’s around 57 miles of chain and rope were being dealt with annually.

The British Postal Museum & Archive (BPMA) is the custodian for the visual, written and physical records of 400 years of postal development. In telling the story of communication, industry, and innovation of the British postal services, many parallels can be drawn with the Great Western Railway site.

Swindon: A new centre for the BPMA

by Jo Sullivan, New Centre Project Assistant

A decision is made
On 16th September 2008, the BPMA’s Board of Trustees chose the former Chain Testing Works at the Churchward Village site in Swindon, Wiltshire, as the intended site of BPMA’s New Centre. This was the culmination of a detailed examination of options and potential sites (of which over 20 were visited) for the BPMA’s plan to provide a new facility for its archive and to restore full physical access to its museum collection.

Why Swindon?
The choice was made after a long and considered site search, including London and other regional centres such as Birmingham and Bristol.  Swindon is a town with a great deal of potential, it has enthusiastic and ambitious leaders who in early 2009 announced a £200 million town centre regeneration scheme.  It is home to a large national and international business community and this is built on excellent transport links.  Swindon is 60 minutes by rail from London Paddington and has regular trains from Bristol, South Wales, the South West and the Midlands.  It is 60 minutes from Heathrow and other airports are easily accessible.

The site
Churchward is just outside the main centre of Swindon and is a 10 minute walk from the station. It is home to the National Trust UK Headquarters, as well as the English Heritage National Monument Record Centre and STEAM (a museum which attracts 100,000 visitors per year). It also houses a designer outlet village (McArthur Glen) which gets close to 3.2 million visitors per year.

Work to the BPMA’s potential home would run alongside the development of residential, business and hotel accommodation nearby, all part of a plan conceived to make the most of an already attractive site.

There would be on-site parking, and greatly improved disabled access, unlike anything we could possibly provide in London. 

The Building
The building offers 43,000 sq ft of ground floor space and there would be a possibly of further increasing the floor space by the use of mezzanine levels.

The building is Grade II Listed and described on the English Heritage ‘At Risk’ register as “a rare example of a railway chain testing house built in 1873”.  Some of the machinery in the floor inside is Grade II*, as it is the last complete example in situ, and the BPMA would be keen to make a focal point of this.

Our aspirations
The BPMA’s New Centre promises many exciting features for researchers and visitors both old and new. It will be a combined museum and archive, offering the best in access to all the wonderful material the BPMA has to offer.

The Royal Mail Archive will have its home at Swindon, with state of the art storage facilities and a superb public Search Room for researchers, designed to the highest possible standard.  We will provide the most up-to-date equipment but continue BPMA’s excellent face-to-face user service.

The BPMA’s New Centre will have space to exhibit our museum collection, opening up this part of our holdings fully for the first time since the National Postal Museum in London  closed in 1998.

There will be areas for exhibiting from our philatelic and wider holdings and for temporary exhibitions. We would hope to produce interesting programmes for the local community of Swindon, as well as something appealing to visitors from far and wide.

We aim to offer facilities for events, meetings and school visits, a conservation studio, and to house partners on site as well.  We will provide flexible space for those that need it; space for our Friends to meet or space to host an event for societies and interest groups.

There will also be a dedicated educational area, providing a physical base to add to BPMA’s already proven success in offering first class educational provision.

More Information
For further information, comments or ideas on the project please contact:

Jo Sullivan
The BPMA
Freeling House
Phoenix Place
LONDON
WC1X 0DL 
jo.sullivan@postalheritage.org.uk
020 7239 2306