Tag Archives: Haverstock School

Guest blog: Arts Award students meet Danny Martin, contemporary war poet

Meet our latest guest bloggers Aldis and Max. Two more 'Communicating Conflict' Arts Award students from Haverstock School.

Meet our latest guest bloggers Aldis and Max. Two more ‘Communicating Conflict’ Arts Award students from Haverstock School.

Last week, the students were visited by Danny Martin, a former soldier and war poet, who now works as an English teacher. 

Here’s what Aldis and Max had to say about Danny’s visit:

Danny’s life is one of the most inspiring anyone could ever hear about. It really made us think about the life of a soldier during war and the hardships that they face. Death and injury haunt them every day. Danny’s inspiration for becoming a soldier was when he was around the same age as us when he joined the army cadets.

Danny first started writing poetry after leaving the army whilst studying for a Creative Writing degree in Liverpool. His poems were published in a book of contemporary war poetry called Heroes.

Danny reading his poem: 'The Haddock of Mass Destruction'

Danny reading his poem: ‘The Haddock of Mass Destruction’

Danny’s poem expresses war differently to what we believe it is like. It really made us think about our lives and how we could change them for the better. Danny describes the commodities of war as pain and suffering instead of being a hero and a patriot.

War poet Danny Martin in action

War poet Danny Martin in action

Aldis and Max were very inspired by Danny’s visit:

We learnt the true side of the story, the kind of thing that we don’t hear on the TV. We learnt the consequences of joining the army. We also learnt that all soldiers have their own different stories of army life however others think they all are the same.

A huge thank you to Danny for visiting Haverstock School. Look out for more from our guest bloggers as they continue to work with project poet Joelle Taylor to develop their own poems in response to the First World War stories in the BPMA collection.

Guest blog: Communicating Conflict Arts Award students

Meet guest bloggers Samiah and Shaima. Two of our Communicating Conflict Arts Award students from Haverstock School.

Meet Samiah and Shaima - two students from Haverstock School.

Meet Samiah and Shaima – two students from Haverstock School.

The Arts Award students recently participated in two workshops with Big Wheel Theatre Company. Here’s what Samiah and Shaima had to say about their experiences.

We are extremely lucky to be taking part in this Arts Award. Last week we were very fortunate to take part in a theatre workshop called ‘Meaning in the Mud’ about poems that were written during the First World War.

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Arts Award students with Roland and George from the Big Wheel Theatre Company.

After the poetry workshop, Roland and George visited us in class to develop our knowledge of the Post Office Rifles. We learnt about three soldiers named Sergeant Alfred Knight, Captain Home Peel and Rifleman Harry Brown. We looked at letters that were sent to Harry Brown’s mother.

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Students discover the story of Post Office Rifle, Harry Brown.

Harry Brown was a Rifleman who was involved in a fierce, bloody, brutal battle at Nieuport Les Bains. When his mother asked to know what happened to her son she received a letter from the Red Cross stating they did not know the whereabouts of her dear son. We later found out, after reading another letter, that he was captured and taken to a prisoner of war camp. This letter was the last letter she ever received from her son. He died at the prisoner of war camp from “inflammation of the lungs”.

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Original letter from the Central Prisoners of War Committee to Harry Brown’s mother.

Roland spoke to us in character about the battlefield and all the tactics used during this horrendous time. We were told about the battle of Wurst Farm Ridge. In this battle we learnt that Post Office Rifle Sergeant Alfred Knight was awarded the Victoria Cross for his leadership and bravery.

We wrote messages of remembrance for the Post Office Rifles.

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Roland and George from Big Wheel Theatre Company took these messages to Ypres and left them at the Post Office Rifles memorial. They are performing their Meaning in the Mud workshop in Belgian schools.

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Thanks to Samiah and Shaima for this fantastic blog. Keep an eye out for more from our Haverstock School Arts Award students as the project progresses.