Tag Archives: Heritage Lottery Fund

Dear Amie: Inspiring formerly trafficked women through postal uniforms

During the past two years our Community Learning Officer, Hannah Clipson, has been developing our audiences in the run-up to opening The Postal Museum. Through engaging new groups we have been able to interpret our collection in new and exciting ways. We have created strong and sustainable bonds with formally under-represented groups who now see us and objects as relevant and of interest. In this post, Hannah shares what she has been up to with the Amies, a group of ten women who are survivors of trafficking.

Established in July 2014, delivered in collaboration with the October Gallery and supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, we engaged with the Amies over a 12 week period. The 10 ladies were originally brought together by PAN Arts, a London-based arts company, and The Poppy Project. This summer we built upon this project, working with the Amies and partnering with the October Gallery, The Mary Ward Centre and The Calthorpe Project. However, this time, we looked at postal uniforms throughout the ages, and used them as inspiration to make our own textile items. Through a series of images, we’ll share what we have been up to.

We started off the project looking at the various bags that have been used by postal workers over the centuries. Inspired by the telegram messenger bags, we made our own versions to practice simple sewing skills.

Leather pouches made by the women, inspired by the telegram messenger bags

Leather pouches made by the women, inspired by the telegram messenger bags

We developed our sewing skills at the Mary Ward Centre through making a bag with a zip using sewing machines. This got the whole group ready to tackle making a skirt, inspired by the post women’s uniform during the First World War. To make the skirt, we explored images from the collection and experimented with patterns, and had a fabric printed containing our favourite images.

Nanda cuts her stamp designed material to make her bag

One of the women cuts her stamp designed material to make her bag

Mani making her bag on the sewing machine

One of the women making her bag on the sewing machine

Asia and Paulina look at images from our collection to inspire our skirt fabric

The group look at images from our collection to inspire our skirt fabric

Mani shows us her ideas for a pattern

One of the women shows us her ideas for a pattern

Nanda works on sewing her skirt

One of the women works on sewing her skirt

One of the fabrics we had digitally printed

One of the fabrics we had digitally printed

Being able to build upon this project and working with these women has been an absolute joy. Seeing the women grow in confidence and help each other to learn new skills (both textile and life skills) whilst using our collection as a platform has been hugely worthwhile and humbling. Partnering with the October Gallery and The Mary Ward Centre has also enabled us to learn new skills from peers; invaluable as we continue to move forward developing our audiences for The Postal Museum. Next steps include planning our next project with the women at The Postal Museum and developing our first community inspired exhibition at our archive in Freeling House. Watch this space!

-Hannah Clipson, Community Learning Officer

This project is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

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Behind the scenes at the Pop-Up Field Post Office

For the next two weeks we’re busy working with Big Wheel Theatre Company to deliver a First World War project for schools and visitors at the Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron.

This week over 300 school pupils will experience Meaning in the Mud: Letters to and from the Front Line, an immersive theatre workshop, and visit our Pop-up Field Post Office. Often little more than a table in a field, sometimes just a tent, or a temporary structure – Field Post Offices provided a vital link between the home and fighting fronts by distributing the letters and parcels sent to soldiers from loved ones.

Photo of a Field Post Office in the BPMA collection.

Photo of a Field Post Office from the BPMA collection.

Here are  a few photos of us building the set to show you more about what the pupils can expect to find out.

Hannah from the BPMA and Maureen from the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust hard at work.

Hannah (BPMA) and Maureen (Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust) working hard to build the set.

During the Meaning in the Mud workshop actors from Big Wheel will show how the war affected the people of Shropshire through an interactive performance using objects, archival sources, poems and photographs from the BPMA collection.

Field Post Office 1

The finished Field Post Office.

After the performance pupils will write their own letters from the Front Line and step into the Field Post Office to send them to their schools.

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Ta Dah! The finished set.

You can follow this project on Twitter #PopUpPost

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This project supports the BPMA’s Last Post: Remembering the First World War exhibition on display in Coalbrookdale until April 2015.

-Sally Sculthorpe, Learning Officer

Meaning in the Mud and the Pop-Up Post Office are generously supported by a grant from the First World War: Then and Now Heritage Lottery Fund.

The BPMA turns 10!

Tomorrow the BPMA turns 10 years old. Director Adrian Steel reflects on the last ten years in today’s post.

In the next couple of weeks we will be celebrating a couple of major milestones. On 9 April I will be marking five years at the helm of the good ship BPMA, and even more excitingly on 29 March, BPMA itself will be 10 years old.

GPO Greetings Telegram. James Matwuss-Judd. 1962

GPO Greetings Telegram. James Matwuss-Judd. 1962

Back in 2004 there was a great deal of work being done to set up what was then a very new idea: an independent charity to manage the heritage services of a larger institution. This is now more commonplace but was then pioneering.

Catalogue team meeting back in 2006. Recognise any familiar faces?

Catalogue team meeting back in 2006. Recognise any familiar faces?

Looking back over the ten years, BPMA’s achievement is not one of big bangs but stage-by-stage advance. Under the leadership of Tony Conder, BPMA’s first CEO, we established our independence from Royal Mail through a series of partnerships, exhibitions and ventures culminating in the opening of the Museum of the Post Office in the Community at Ironbridge in 2009. For the first time BPMA had its own exhibition space and its own visitors, over 100,000 in the first year. Other exhibitions such as ‘Moving the Mail’ at the Coventry Transport Museum also began to draw the crowds.

There were also attempts at pursuing our core mission – giving Britain’s postal heritage a new home – but these seemed to come unstuck for a whole series of reasons, much to BPMA’s great regret. In the end, 2011 proved to be the year when things started to go right for us on this score. The Postal Services Act affirmed the importance of securing Britain’s postal heritage and that same year Royal Mail offered us a building in London, plus core funding, to make the museum happen.

Stocktake back in 2007.

Stocktake back in 2007.

Planning permission was granted in 2012, along with a Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) Round One pass and grant for our project. There have been bumps along the way, a lot of media interest of late, and a phenomenal effort from BPMA colleagues past and present for which I am very grateful. At the time of writing, ten years after our foundation, we await only the HLF’s grant verdict before we can literally begin to build our future.

Our vision for the next ten years is to secure and open this first class new home, the Postal Museum & Mail Rail, in 2016; cement our place as a sustainable, national, cultural attraction; grow the BPMA’s services nationally and internationally; and, from the base we will have, to grow digitally, grow our funding and build for the future. Based on our record to date I am sure that we will successfully deliver on this.

Here’s to the next ten years of BPMA! 

-Adrian Steel, Director

BPMA at the V&A – First World War: Stories of the Empire event

This Friday (24 January), from 6-9pm, the BPMA are taking part in the free drop-in event: First World War: Stories of the Empire. The event has been organised by the Heritage Lottery Fund in collaboration with the V&A and is being held at the V&A’s Sackler Gallery.

A large number of museums and organisations are taking part with a variety of engaging  stands and displays. The purpose of the evening is to encourage greater understanding of the First World War and the role of Black and Asian soldiers from the Empire.

Lieutenant-General Sir Pratap Singh and the Rajah of Ratlam, at Sir Douglas Haig’s Chateau in Montreuil, 17th June 1916 © IWM (Q 692)

Lieutenant-General Sir Pratap Singh and the Rajah of Ratlam, at Sir Douglas Haig’s Chateau in Montreuil, 17th June 1916 © IWM (Q 692)

Volumes of mail in the First World War were huge. Exceptional organisation and logistical control was required to ensure mail reached the front lines as quickly as possible. From October to December 1914 alone, over 1.2 million parcels were sent to the troops. All troops were able to send letters home free of charge.

Australian mail storage in Kew (POST 56/6)

Australian mail storage in Kew (POST 56/6)

The BPMA stand will consist of the touring version of Last Post: Remembering the First World War, plus two new additional panels focusing on the wider delivery of mail across the world during the First World War. Panel research for the new panels was undertaken by AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award PhD student Victoria Davis. Additional research has been completed by Dr Pete Sutton. We will have plenty of other material available on the night and also have a number of First World War handling items available for visitors.

The shipping of mails (POST 56/6)

The shipping of mails (POST 56/6)

The evening is a drop-in event and begins with a drinks reception at 6pm, open to all. Activities and stands will be available throughout the evening. A panel discussion begins in the auditorium at 7.45pm.

The BPMA stand will be situated downstairs in the V&A Sackler Centre, directly behind the Sackler Centre Reception desk.  We look forward to seeing you on the night!

Check out our Flickr set on the First World War. We will be updating it regularly with images from our archive relating to postal history and the war.

-Dominique Gardner, Exhibitions Officer

Initial HLF support for new Postal Museum & Archive secured

The British Postal Museum & Archive (BPMA) is delighted to announce that the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) has confirmed a first-round pass as part of a two stage application process to help move its world-class collections into a new, accessible and permanent home. Initial HLF support has been awarded for an application of £4.25m and development funding of £250,000 has been awarded. The new Postal Museum & Archive will be situated in Calthorpe House on London’s Mount Pleasant site, where the country’s oldest mail centre is located.

Visualisation of Calthorpe House (Feildon Clegg Bradley Studios).

Visualisation of Calthorpe House (Feildon Clegg Bradley Studios).

The first-round pass means that the BPMA can now progress to the feasibility stage of its development and work up detailed proposals ahead of a round two application in 2013 to secure the remaining £4m. Further activities to generate funding to create a state of the art museum and visitor facility are taking place throughout 2012-13. The opening of the new museum is planned for late 2014.

The new Postal Museum will provide access to the BPMA’s unique collections of 400 years of postal, social and design history. The collections, which include iconic objects such as red pillar boxes and postal vehicles, as well as every British stamp issued since the Penny Black, original design artwork, posters and photographs, are currently stored in cramped and inaccessible conditions. The new centre will also enable a vast expansion of its educational programme and engagement with young visitors.

Visualisation of exhibition space.

Visualisation of exhibition space.

The fascinating story of the Post Office Underground Railway will form part of the exhibition, together with other captivating stories from social, postal and design history.

Sue Bowers, Head of Heritage Lottery Fund London, said:

The British Postal Museum and Archive’s collection gives us a fascinating insight into 400 years of postal history and how it has shaped our world today. We’re pleased to be giving initial support for this exciting project to regenerate the Royal Mail’s Mount Pleasant site and give an internationally important collection a permanent home in the heart of London. We will be working closely with the Postal Heritage Trust over the coming months as they progress plans to secure a full Heritage Lottery Fund grant.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said:

The British Postal Museum & Archive is a national treasure of global importance. London plays a central role in its rich history so it is entirely fitting that this city would house a suitable showcase for the collection, creating a fantastic new visitor attraction to boot. I am thrilled that money from the Heritage Lottery Fund has been awarded to enable this exciting project to progress to the next important stage.

Adrian Steel, Director of the BPMA commented:

We are delighted that the Heritage Lottery Fund has given such a strong indication of its support for a new Postal Museum & Archive. HLF initial investment of £250,000, together with public recognition from such a prestigious funder, is a ringing endorsement of our work to preserve Britain’s postal heritage. It allows us to embark on the next stage of this exciting project to bring the human story of communication, industry and innovation to everyone.

Join The British Postal Museum & Archive mailing list to receive updates on our New Centre project and other activities.

‘Postal People’ at Bruce Castle Museum, Tottenham

The exhibition space at Bruce Castle

The exhibition space at Bruce Castle

by Adrian Steel, Director

Last week I visited Bruce Castle Museum in Tottenham, North London, to see their ‘Postal People’ exhibition which runs until the end of the year.

Bruce Castle has been a museum since 1906, but is strongly connected with postal reformer Rowland Hill whose family ran a progressive school for boys there during the Victorian period.

Greetings telegram artwork

Greetings telegram artwork

‘Postal People’ is the result of a partnership project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and BPMA, and supported by Bruce Castle Museum, BPMA and the Communication Workers Union, who own the Morten Collection of postal history material kept at Bruce Castle. This project, called ‘Pistols, Packets and Postmen’, saw the cataloguing and proper preservation of postal history material stored at Bruce Castle, with educational events provided for all and volunteer participation helping the project along.

Stamps and postal history on display

Stamps and postal history on display

Bruce Castle is a very interesting place to visit and a superb facility for the people of Tottenham and beyond. ‘Postal People’ is in a light and airy room on the first floor and provides interesting commentary from ten people who have looked through the postal history material held at Bruce Castle and chosen their favourite objects.

Postal People can also be found online.

BPMA New Centre project receives grant from Heritage Lottery Fund

by Jo Sullivan, Project Officer: New Centre Project 

BPMA’s project to create a new Postal Museum & Archive on the Churchward Village site in Swindon recently received a piece of exciting news as the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) confirmed our first round pass for a grant of £2,617,800, including development funding of £117,800.

Architect's design for the New Centre main entrance

Architect's design for the New Centre main entrance

The first-round pass means that we can begin the development stage of the project and work up detailed proposals ahead of a round two application in 2011. In a tough funding climate, and against unprecedented competition, our project to move our fascinating collections into a new, accessible and permanent home has taken a step closer to becoming a reality.

The HLF was established in the United Kingdom under the National Lottery Act 1993. From museums, parks and historic places to archaeology, the natural environment and cultural traditions, the HLF provides grants to support all aspects of the UK’s diverse heritage. Since 1994 the HLF has supported more than 33,900 projects allocating £4.4billion across the UK.

What the New Centre gallery might look like

What the New Centre gallery might look like

The BPMA is in good company in the South West. In March this year the HLF gave the green light to Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum to work up plans to create a new gallery revealing the history and archaeology of the Salisbury and surrounding area.

Over the years other grants in the South West have varied in size and scope from the £17 million awarded to the National Maritime Museum, Falmouth, to £295,000 awarded to the University of Bristol to ‘release’ Britain’s oldest dinosaur after 210 million years of being entombed in rock.

Chain Testing Machinery from the railway era within the proposed New Centre building

Chain Testing Machinery from the railway era within the proposed New Centre building

Whilst Swindon has been recognised by the HLF as being a priority area it is certainly not lacking in culturally rich attractions. We look forward to developing mutually beneficial relationships with the existing group of cultural organisations based on the Churchward Village site: English Heritage, the National Trust and STEAM, Museum of the Great Western Railway.

Also it’s not just museums moving to Swindon as on 24th March 2010 it was announced that Swindon is now headquarters for Britain’s first national space agency. As well as the United Kingdom Space Agency (UKSA), Swindon is also home to the two main space funding bodies — the Science and Technology Facilities Council and the Natural Environment Research Council.

Find out more about the New Centre project on our website.