Tag Archives: Mail Rail

Vintage GPO Posters go up for online Auction

As regular readers will have seen here at the BPMA we have a stunning poster collection. The General Post Office (GPO) was a trendsetting organisation, particularly when it came to marketing, and in the 1930s it broke the mould with its innovative poster designs.

James Mawtus-Judd

Poster on careful packing by James Mawtus-Judd

This Thursday (9 July) we’ll be offering the public a rare opportunity to own a piece of iconic design when we put a significant selection of vintage GPO posters (duplicate to our collections) up for online auction via Onslows Auction House.

John Vickery (2)

Poster from the Outposts of Empire series by John Vickery

These stunning images come from this golden age of public relations at the GPO, between the 1930s and 1960s. Some of the most prominent artists and designers of the time vied for commissions, creating striking posters on a range on subjects from airmail through to pleas for the careful packing of parcels.

Harry Stevens

Poster calling for careful packaging by Harry Stevens

The posters to go on sale include works by Edward McKnight Kauffer, Tom Eckersley, John Armstrong, Jan Le Witt and George Him. Many of these artists went on to take commissions at places such as London Transport and the Ministry of Information where they created iconic designs to support the war effort during the Second World War.

Edward McKnight Kauffer

Poster from the Outposts of Britain series by Edward McKnight Kauffer

The money raised at auction will go towards delivering The Postal Museum and Mail Rail, where posters, and design more generally, will play a vital role in telling the remarkable stories of how the British postal service helped to shape our social and communications history.

Please visit Onslows website to view the full auction catalogue.

My Favourite Object: Pentacycle

In this month’s edition of My Favourite Object, find out why the Pentacycle is Head of Fundraising Emma’s absolute favourite.

Perhaps the perfect symbol of the Victorian spirit of invention, often seen as eccentric by today’s standards, the Pentacycle was invented in 1882 – not long after the more famous “Penny-farthing” and before safety bicycles, more recognisable as ancestors of the bikes we ride today, were introduced.

Front of Player's Cycling cigarette card showing four postmen on Centre cycles, otherwise known as 'Hen and Chicks'.

Front of Player’s Cycling cigarette card showing four postmen on Centre cycles, otherwise known as ‘Hen and Chicks’.

Designed by Edward Burstow, an architect from Horsham in Sussex, the Pentacycle was conceived to enable larger postal loads to be carried and delivered with ease. Although popular with postal delivery workers in Horsham, it did not catch on more widely, and certainly does not look an easy or comfortable ride by today’s standards!

I have a couple of reasons for choosing the Pentacycle as ‘My Favourite Object'; firstly because it is just such a fantastic looking machine. It is large, awkward-looking and, although I have no idea what it would be like to ride, certainly does not look user-friendly (and that’s with its capacious mail baskets empty). Yet, despite all of this the very concept feels ambitious and visionary…why wouldn’t it catch on? It’s this sense of optimism and spirit of adventure that really make me connect with the Pentacycle.

Me with the Pentacyle at our Museum Store in Debden.

Selfie with the Pentacyle at our Museum Store in Essex.

I also love its nick-name “the Hen and Chicks”. The reason for this excellent name can be understood simply from viewing the image below, and lends such personality to this ungainly invention. It perhaps conveys the affection with which the postmen who rode the bikes referenced them, and the interest visitors to the collection are still compelled to show the Pentacycle on seeing for the first time.

Pentacycle Debden

Pentacyle at our store in Essex.

 

Although the Pentacycle, or a 1930s replica of one, is currently housed at the BPMA’s Museum Store in Debden, Essex, it will be the central object on display in the ‘Revolutionising Communications’ exhibition zone of The Postal Museum when it opens. This gives it an important role, along with many other unique and surprising objects which will be on permanent display to the public from late 2016, in providing a window on the past through the perspective of the postal service.

View from below

View from below

Working at the BPMA I feel uniquely privileged to have more of an insight into the collection, and to be able to explore and connect with items such as the Pentacycle or ‘Hen and Chicks’. Bringing remarkable items, such as this, to a wider audience than ever before is exactly why The Postal Museum and Mail Rail will be so important. I, for one, am looking forward to seeing visitors of all ages explore, experience and be inspired by this history of adventure and the pioneering spirit that has driven communications forward over the past 500 years and will continue to do so into the future.

-Emma Jhita, Head of Fundraising

Capturing Mail Rail in 3D: The Next Steps

Imagine a place frozen in time, left exactly as it was the day that everyone left it. That is what it’s like in Mail Rail today. After it was mothballed in 2003, everything was left as it was that day, down to the newspapers, rota and personal belongings. This time capsule effect is part of what makes Mail Rail unique and exciting; however when we start construction later this year to convert it into a ride and visitor attraction we’ll have to make a few changes to ensure it’s safe and accessible for visitors. We are keen that the space remains as true to how it is now as possible, but these changes mean that the little things could be lost. We thought long and hard about how we could preserve Mail Rail exactly as it is today. The solution we came up with was 3D scanning.

Just before Christmas ScanLAB Projects, a 3D scanning and visualisation company based in East London, spent a week down in Mail Rail and captured the Mount Pleasant depot, loop and platforms in 3D. In total they completed over 223 terrestrial laser scans with incredible and accurate results.

View of the Mount Pleasant platforms

View of the Mount Pleasant platforms

The scans that ScanLAB have created show all the minute detail of the spaces, preserving Mail Rail as it is now for us all to explore in years to come, including parts of Mail Rail that visitors to the site won’t be able to see, such as the train graveyard.

Capture

Fly-through of the train graveyard

 

Of course the results have got our creative gears spinning. Increasingly visitors are expecting an increased level of digital interactivity from a visitor to a museum, allowing them to interact with exhibits and collections through devices such as smart phones and tablets, before, during and after their visit – but how can we use these scans to enhance the visitor experience, both physically and remotely?

The guys at ScanLAB gave us a demo of just this; using an Oculus Rift headset we explored the train graveyard and the depot. BPMA staff delighted in walking around, reaching out to touch trains and walls, and even ‘sitting’ in one of the trains!

Looking around the Mount Pleasant Depot through Oculus Rift headset

Other possibilities include augmented reality apps for smart devices, projections or 3D printed installations –the options are endless– so what would you do with them?

Mail Rail Book Reading Event

With building works to transform Mail Rail into an exciting and immersive national visitor attraction as part of The Postal Museum set to begin in the next few months, opportunities to show off this extraordinary and inspiring space in all its mothballed glory are becoming increasingly limited. Hannah Clipson, BPMA Community Learning Officer tells us about a recent event which did just that…

From 1927 to 2003, Mail Rail transported huge volumes of post under the streets of London, beneath the feet of millions of blissfully unaware commuters and tradesmen going about their daily business 70 feet above. Opened in an age when the horse and cart ran alongside new-fangled automobiles, it was a technological innovation that kept people in touch across ever-greater distances and at ever-greater speed. Since the last shift when workers downed their tools in 2003, the Mail Rail has sat, silently gathering dust. Until now!

On 25 March, a lucky group of visitors were granted access to this hidden landmark as the Mail Rail Car Depot, where trains from across the network were brought for repair, became the dramatic backdrop for a very special BPMA event.

In collaboration with Cityread London 2015, an annual celebration that encourages all of London to pick up the same book and read it together, Ben Aaronovitch, author of the Sunday Times best-selling urban fantasy/crime fiction series Rivers of London, unveiled a special new short story, King of the Rats, read by comedian, rapper and entertainer Doc Brown, aka Ben Bailey Smith.

Ben Bailey Smith, aka Doc Brown reads a short story by Ben Aaranovitch, 'King of the Rats'.

Ben Bailey Smith, aka Doc Brown reads a short story by Ben Aaranovitch, ‘King of the Rats’.

“When a self-styled King of the Rats crashes a corporate do hosted by Fleet and Tyburn naturally the Folly are called in.  Peter and Kumar have to determine whether his majesty is the legitimate ruler of the rat nation or a sad man with a rodent fixation.

And they’d better do it fast before irate Rivers decide to embark on a bit of DIY pest control.”

After being treated to this new instalment, fans were able to pick the author’s brain during a lively Q&A session!

Ben Aaranovitch answers questions from the audience.

Ben Aaranovitch answers questions from the audience.

The evening marked the start of Cityread’s 2015 season. Over the next month Rivers of London will be the theme behind a programme of exciting events across all 33 London boroughs.

You can hear the full story, read by Doc Brown, below

#MuseumWeek at the BPMA

Next week (23 – 29 March) we will be participating in #MuseumWeek on Twitter with over 1400 other museums and heritage sites from around the world. We have been working hard gathering stories, pictures and more to share with you! Here’s a sneak peak at what you can expect:

group

Monday – #secretsMW

We will be revealing objects that will appear in The Postal Museum and Mail Rail. Tune in to see if you can guess the object! You will also find out what goes on behind the scenes in our museum store, conservation studio and archive through pictures and stories from our staff.

Can you guess what this iconic object is?

Can you guess what this iconic object is?

Tuesday – #souvenirsMW

We will be sharing gifts from our shop, and of course pictures of staff with their favourite mug. We would love to see your BPMA souvenirs in use!

Wednesday – #architectureMR

Find out more about the history behind the building that will become The Postal Museum: Calthorpe House. We will also be sharing images and plans for post offices and sorting offices around the UK, including a pub or two. Share pictures of your local post office!

An early photo of Calthorpe House - the home of The Postal Museum

An early photo of Calthorpe House – the home of The Postal Museum

Thursday – #inspirationMW

Do you have a favourite letter? What is the most unusual or surprising thing you have received in the post? We want to hear your stories – they could end up in The Postal Museum!

Friday – #familyMW

We have been busy putting together a new family-friendly exhibition and activities at Islington Museum and will be live tweeting from venue.

Our new travelling exhibition debuting at Islington Museum!

Our new travelling exhibition debuting at Islington Museum!

Saturday – #favMW

It was no easy task, but our staff have come up with their favourite objects and stories from the collections. From a letter that took nearly 80 years to reach its destination to a prosthetic arm for sorting. Do you have a favourite story or object from a visit with us? We’d love to see it!

Sunday – #poseMW

We are suckers for a good #pillarboxselfie! We will be sharing staff selfies, send us yours using #pillarboxselfie.

Staff #pillarboxselfie with a Penfold on Ladbroke Grove. Share yours with us next week!

Staff #pillarboxselfie with a Penfold on Ladbroke Grove. Share yours with us next week!

Join us on Twitter next week for #museumweek along with museums and heritage sites from around the world!

Exploring 3D technologies at the BPMA

The last 12 months have been exciting for the Digital team here at the BPMA. Our Share Academy/London Museums Group funded project, From Vault to View, which partnered us with Mona Hess from UCL’s Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering Department, has given us both a lot to do and to think about. The project has now come to an end, but it has increased the knowledge we now have of 3D technologies, and encouraged us to do much more.

rtf

George V Die for striking leads. 1½d postage British Empire Exhibition, 1925

The aim of the project was to test different methods of capturing objects in 3D. Working with our little-viewed objects, Mona tried a variety of techniques to see what would produce good 3D models and what wouldn’t. The objects chosen posed real challenges: many were made of bright metals, which makes them difficult to capture using laser scanning or photogrammetry techniques; some were complex shapes, such as a flintlock pistol; while others had such a lack of detail making them difficult to measure and recreate as 3D computer models.

So what did we get out of it? Before the project we knew very little about how 3D

imaging worked. We felt the buzz around these technologies, such as 3D printing, but had little idea of how these things were created or how they might be used. All we really knew was that we had a rich treasure of 3D objects that no-one could really access physically in a satisfactory way.

By the end of the project, the BPMA had purchased photogrammetry software which has enabled us to try 3D imaging for ourselves – and the results are extremely promising. These techniques can be learnt by our staff and employed to create 3D models of items in the museum collection for exploration by the public.

This new-found knowledge, though still fairly elementary, has given us confidence to explore other uses for 3D imaging. In December 3D experts, ScanLab Projects, spent a week scanning the work depot, platforms and tunnels of Mail Rail which we will be opening to the public in 2016 as part of our plans for The Postal Museum. The results are truly astounding and we hope to show them in the near future.

Scanner capturing Mount Pleasant platform

Scanner capturing Mount Pleasant platform

Beyond all this, the project has given us an opportunity to revisit the objects and see them afresh. Although we weren’t able to obtain good 3D models of objects such as the large printing plates and the rollers, we did get excellent images of a number of dies using a technique known as Reflectance Transformation Imaging [RTI]. We also obtained an excellent laser-scanned 3D model of the Machin cast of Queen Elizabeth II – a truly unique and iconic object. The fruits of these experiments will eventually be made available via our website and online catalogue as we integrate the technology.

Plaster head of HM the Queen made by Arnold Machin for new definitive issue of stamps, third version (POST 118/5373)

Plaster head of HM the Queen made by Arnold Machin for new definitive issue of stamps, third version (POST 118/5373)

-Martin Devereux, Head of Digital

Capturing Mail Rail: 3D survey of the depot, loop and platforms

Last week was an exciting one for the Digital team here at BPMA! For the past five days, Rachel and I have been accompanying ScanLAB Projects Ltd. while they undertake a 3D survey of Mail Rail.

_MG_7003

Scanner capturing the west platform.

 

ScanLAB have been targeting the areas of the network that are to be the focus of our Mail Rail  visitor attraction – that is the work depot at Mount Pleasant, the platforms beneath Mount Pleasant and the tunnel loop from the depot to the platforms – just about 1km of tunnels.

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Will from Scanlab discusses the technology with guests from FARO, New Scientist and Harry (BPMA Communications Manager).

 

The 3D scanning of Mail Rail is important in that it captures the industrial heritage of an unexplored and little-known feature of central London. The survey records the details and the features of Mail Rail as a working space, with all the flotsam and jetsam left behind when the service was suspended. From tools and equipment to newspapers and calendars from over a decade ago, Mail Rail is a time capsule just waiting to be explored. These features will inevitably be tidied up when we open it to the public so it is crucial to capture that detail for posterity.

_MG_7019

Thomas and Will from Scanlab sharing the raw data.

 

The survey will allow users to see these features in three dimensions – bringing the platforms to life in ways not possible even when the train ride is running. The survey can be shown via the web and used in the exhibitions we create at the Postal Museum and Mail Rail attraction to offer a truly explorative experience of Mail Rail in a way that the train ride cannot. Imagine navigating the tunnels and platforms for yourself?

Scanner on the platform.

Scanner on the platform.

Using the latest scanning technology from FARO, and using the surveying and imaging expertise of ScanLAB, we will be obtaining as faithful a representation of the site as we possibly can. From the work depot to the platforms and the tunnels in the loop around Mount Pleasant, we will be recording a truly significant piece of Britain’s industrial history.

-Martin Devereux, Head of Digital