Tag Archives: murder

The postman who was a serial killer

Few people would think that this could be so. Yet John Reginald Halliday Christie of 10 Rillington Place, one of the twentieth century’s most notorious serial killers had worked for the Post Office on two occasions.

The first instance was shortly after he returned to his home town of Halifax after military service in the First World War. On 10 January 1921, Christie was enrolled as a temporary postman there, and was paid £2 18s 2d per week. His life took a turn for the worse on Tuesday 5 April 1921, when he appeared at Halifax Magistrates’ Court. Detective Inspector Sykes provided evidence to the effect that on 20 February, two postal orders had been stolen.

Convictions and dismissals of Post Office employees, 1916-1922. Record pertaining to John Christie highlighted. (POST 120/160)

Convictions and dismissals of Post Office employees, 1916-1922. Record pertaining to John Christie highlighted. (POST 120/160)

Questions had arisen because letters were going missing from Halifax Post Office and a Mr Drennan had been called upon to make enquiries. On 4 April he had found a letter in a public lavatory at Crossley Street, Halifax. This was a letter which Christie should have delivered. Drennan then followed Christie home and had a detective search him. He found four postal orders on his person. He also found several other postal orders, together with cheques and dividends at the house. They totalled several hundred pounds, including a £100 Bank of England warrant, cheques to the value of £600 and money orders worth £14 10s.

The defence rested on the prisoner’s previously exemplary character. The verdict, though, was that Christie was guilty and he was sentenced to three months in prison at Manchester. It is uncertain why he committed these crimes because he did not need the money; yet ex-servicemen with good war records had been known to go off the rails when their lives were no longer governed by external discipline.

Two decades later, just after another World War, on 21 May 1946 he rejoined the Post Office. He was employed as a Grade 2 clerk in the Post Office Savings Bank at Blythe Road, Shepherd’s Bush.

Exterior of the Post Office Savings Bank, Blythe Road, Shepherd’s Bush (POST 118/248)

Exterior of the Post Office Savings Bank, Blythe Road, Shepherd’s Bush (POST 118/248)

In August 1947 he was employed as a clerk at the Post Office Savings Bank at Kew and was in the First Aid party there.

Post Office Savings Bank, clerks at work (POST 118/269)

Post Office Savings Bank, clerks at work (POST 118/269)

His job at the Post Office came to an end on 4 April 1950, twenty nine years to the day he had left it previously. Christie claimed he had been ill, and off work and that on his return he was escorted from the premises by two investigating officers. It is often asserted that his employers discovered that, at the trial of Timothy Evans in January 1950, where Christie was the key Crown witness, he had a criminal record, as disclosed by the defence. Yet the dismissal book in the Post Office archives enigmatically states that the reason for his dismissal was ‘changes affecting the character’.

Convictions and Dismissals of Post Office Employees, 1949-1951. Record pertaining to John Christie highlighted. (POST 120/170)

Convictions and Dismissals of Post Office Employees, 1949-1951. Record pertaining to John Christie highlighted. (POST 120/170)

Three years later, Christie’s murders were revealed and he was hanged for murder. Ironically the investigating officer at the Post Office in 1950 was a man with the surname Death.

– Jonathan Oates, author of the upcoming book John Christie of Rillington Place: Biography of a Serial Killer, published by Pen and Sword, 2012.

2009 File Openings at the British Postal Museum & Archive

by Gavin McGuffie, Catalogue Manager

Recently opened files from 1977-78.

Recently opened files from 1977-78.

At the start of each year here at the BPMA we go through the process of making a selected batch of Royal Mail Archive material available to the public for the first time. Broadly speaking these are files that reached the thirtieth anniversary of their closure the previous year, so for last year files which contain material dating up to and including 1978.

What this involves in practice is searching our database for any records whose ‘closed until’ date is 1st January 2009, printing this off, then going down to our repository to change any files that have physically been marked as ‘closed’ to ‘open’, and finally changing the status of the records on the online catalogue.

This year we’ve opened about 150 files and descriptions, particularly material from the following POST classes: POST 52 (Stamp Depot), POST 65 (Staff Associations), POST 69 (Royal Mail Board and its Predecessors) and POST 122 (Registered Files, Minuted and Decentralised Registry Papers).

POST 60/335, a report on attitudes to working in the Post Office in the London area, found that job security was the main reason for joining while the perception that the nature of the work permitted a fair degree of freedom was also attractive.

Among matters discussed in recently opened POST 69 Board minutes was the controversial Grunwick dispute in which postal workers in north-west London refused to deliver the mail of Grunwick Film Processing Laboratories during a period of industrial action over union recognition at the company.

POST 120/478 and 486 contain photographs and other details of investigations into a robbery and murder at Potter’s Road sub-office in New Barnet.

If the recommendations of the Dacre review into Public Records are made law then the amount of material going through this process will increase for the next few years. Two years’ worth of records will be opened en masse every year for the next 15 years until the standard closure period for Public Records becomes 15 years.

The 1978 files and many more can be found using the BPMA’s online catalogue. To view these files please see our Vistor’s Guide.