Tag Archives: plans

Volunteer re-housing project

As part of our preparations to move to our new site at Calthorpe House, work has recently begun on ensuring our collections are in a fit condition to move. There are three areas of work already underway, and more will start over the coming months.

Phase boxing

Many of our archive volumes have weakened or damaged bindings. These require additional support in the form of phase boxes prior to moving. We currently have two volunteers involved in this project, Eric Hearn and Colette Bush. Over the past few months they have received training on how to create the boxes, which require careful measurements of the volumes and often need final adjustments to fit comfortably.

Volunteer Eric at work.

Volunteer Eric at work.

Volumes prior to phase boxing.

Volumes prior to phase boxing.

The phase boxed volumes.

The phase boxed volumes.

Rolled plans

Following the work began in February 2012 on re-housing plans of furniture, fixtures and fittings (archive class POST 91) we have very recently extended this to other rolled plans. The plans being re-housed were previously stored in large rolls in map bags or mail sacks. These storage conditions offered little protection to the rolls in situ, and were entirely inadequate for moving this material. We now have two conservation volunteers (Cristina Rico Liria and Ana Paula Hirata Tanaka) working together our Conservation Assistant (Collections Move) to improve the storage conditions for these vulnerable items.

Volunteers at work.

Volunteers at work.

Rolls prior to rehousing.

Rolls prior to rehousing.

The rehoused rolls.

The rehoused rolls.

Slogan dies

Work has also begun on auditing and packing the museum collection, specifically our slogan die collection. Slogan dies are made from metal and our collection of around 2,000 reflects a huge variety of slogans used on postmarks throughout the 20th century. These items required re-housing for several reasons: metal items are very susceptible to handling, the grease on our hands can permanently damage them, they are currently stored in non conservation materials and often hundreds to a box, making them very heavy to move and hard to quickly locate individual items.

As such, Cyril Parsons and Fahema Begum are working on a project to re-house the dies using conservation materials so that the dies can be seen and handled whilst being protected from any damage. They are also updating our database, entering any additional information about the objects and ensuring their location is noted to the fullest extent possible. This is important as a major aspect of the move will be ensuring tight location and movement control so that we always know where an object is at any given time.

Volunteer Fahema at work.

Volunteer Fahema at work.

Slogan dies before rehousing.

Slogan dies before rehousing.

Slogan dies after rehousing.

Slogan dies after rehousing.

Over the coming months we will continue to work to bring the housing of the collections up to safe standards to move. There is a significant amount of work still to be done, and we would not be able to achieve this without the time and dedication of our volunteers. If you are interested in being involved with this work please contact Helen Dafter on helen.dafter@postalheritage.org.uk or 020 7239 5119.

– Helen Dafter, Archivist and Emma Harper, Curator (Move Planning)

New records released on our online catalogue

Thankfully, our recent problems with the online catalogue appear to be resolved. We apologise for the inconvenience you may have suffered in recent weeks.

The online catalogue service began switching itself off when we upgraded the catalogue system software. We noticed that our web server was having problems with the new software almost immediately. Although we did test the system before we installed it on our web server, a bug in the system did not become apparent until the online catalogue interface began asking for data from the system database. We’ve now reverted to a stable version of the system so hopefully we will not have any more unplanned interruptions to the online catalogue service.

On a more positive note, we can reveal that 4752 records have been added to the online catalogue and these are now available to the public. These include:

POST 91: Buildings, Furniture and Fittings – over 3000 descriptions of plans, blueprints, photographs, illustrations and documents relating to Post Office sites and installations across the United Kingdom between c.1780 and 2002. We’ve digitised a small number of these records and we hope to attach these to their descriptions in the following months.

King Edward Building - two keyboard operators at Single Position Letter Sorting Machine (SPLSM), November 1971 (POST 118/6024)

King Edward Building - two keyboard operators at Single Position Letter Sorting Machine (SPLSM), November 1971 (POST 118/6024)

POST 118: Post Office Photograph Library – 450 descriptions of photographs from 1967-1999. These images form part of a series of photographs compiled by library staff during the course of their work. They include many colour medium-format photographs of sorting offices, technical photographs of equipment and postmen and women on delivery. These records often include digital images of the photographs themselves. Further records from this series will be released in the future.

From the museum collection we have added an additional 450 detailed descriptions of textile and uniform, many of which include photographs of the uniforms. Other significant releases from the museum collection include an additional 114 prints and drawings, and a further 210 handstamps.

Coat Jacket - British Postal Agency (Tangier), c. 1950 (2011-0338)

Coat Jacket - British Postal Agency (Tangier), c. 1950 (2011-0338)

From our philatelic collections, King George VI Overprints are now available, including postage due label overprints. This collection of definitives, commemoratives, high value definitive stamps and postage due label registration sheets include overprints relating to the official use of these stamps in various territories under British control, including the Gulf and former Italian colonies in Africa, occupied by British troops during Word War II.

KGVI 6d purple, overprinted 'B.M.A. TRIPOLITANIA 12 M.A.L.', registration sheet, perforated (POST 150/KGVI/O/BRA/ICL/0008)

KGVI 6d purple, overprinted 'B.M.A. TRIPOLITANIA 12 M.A.L.', registration sheet, perforated (POST 150/KGVI/O/BRA/ICL/0008)

Holding particular political and historical significance today, registration sheets overprinted for ‘British Military Administration’ and ‘British Administration’ in ‘Tripolitania’, a historic region in the former province of Libya are included in the collection. These stamps provide a reminder of British domination of this former Italian colony, both in terms of its military administration and also on a civilian basis. Tripolitania included Tripoli in the old system and these registration sheets document the fact that Britain actually set up the combined state of Libya. The British backed King Idris to become Emir of Tripolitania who also proclaimed an independent Emirate of Cyrenaica in 1949.

Various postal agencies in the Gulf used British overprinted stamps after 1948, including Bahrain, Kuwait, Muscat and Qatar.

– Martin Devereux, Acting Catalogue Manager

Search our online catalogue at www.postalheritage.org.uk/catalogue.