Tag Archives: Scanlab

Capturing Mail Rail in 3D: The Next Steps

Imagine a place frozen in time, left exactly as it was the day that everyone left it. That is what it’s like in Mail Rail today. After it was mothballed in 2003, everything was left as it was that day, down to the newspapers, rota and personal belongings. This time capsule effect is part of what makes Mail Rail unique and exciting; however when we start construction later this year to convert it into a ride and visitor attraction we’ll have to make a few changes to ensure it’s safe and accessible for visitors. We are keen that the space remains as true to how it is now as possible, but these changes mean that the little things could be lost. We thought long and hard about how we could preserve Mail Rail exactly as it is today. The solution we came up with was 3D scanning.

Just before Christmas ScanLAB Projects, a 3D scanning and visualisation company based in East London, spent a week down in Mail Rail and captured the Mount Pleasant depot, loop and platforms in 3D. In total they completed over 223 terrestrial laser scans with incredible and accurate results.

View of the Mount Pleasant platforms

View of the Mount Pleasant platforms

The scans that ScanLAB have created show all the minute detail of the spaces, preserving Mail Rail as it is now for us all to explore in years to come, including parts of Mail Rail that visitors to the site won’t be able to see, such as the train graveyard.

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Fly-through of the train graveyard

 

Of course the results have got our creative gears spinning. Increasingly visitors are expecting an increased level of digital interactivity from a visitor to a museum, allowing them to interact with exhibits and collections through devices such as smart phones and tablets, before, during and after their visit – but how can we use these scans to enhance the visitor experience, both physically and remotely?

The guys at ScanLAB gave us a demo of just this; using an Oculus Rift headset we explored the train graveyard and the depot. BPMA staff delighted in walking around, reaching out to touch trains and walls, and even ‘sitting’ in one of the trains!

Looking around the Mount Pleasant Depot through Oculus Rift headset

Other possibilities include augmented reality apps for smart devices, projections or 3D printed installations –the options are endless– so what would you do with them?

Exploring 3D technologies at the BPMA

The last 12 months have been exciting for the Digital team here at the BPMA. Our Share Academy/London Museums Group funded project, From Vault to View, which partnered us with Mona Hess from UCL’s Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering Department, has given us both a lot to do and to think about. The project has now come to an end, but it has increased the knowledge we now have of 3D technologies, and encouraged us to do much more.

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George V Die for striking leads. 1½d postage British Empire Exhibition, 1925

The aim of the project was to test different methods of capturing objects in 3D. Working with our little-viewed objects, Mona tried a variety of techniques to see what would produce good 3D models and what wouldn’t. The objects chosen posed real challenges: many were made of bright metals, which makes them difficult to capture using laser scanning or photogrammetry techniques; some were complex shapes, such as a flintlock pistol; while others had such a lack of detail making them difficult to measure and recreate as 3D computer models.

So what did we get out of it? Before the project we knew very little about how 3D

imaging worked. We felt the buzz around these technologies, such as 3D printing, but had little idea of how these things were created or how they might be used. All we really knew was that we had a rich treasure of 3D objects that no-one could really access physically in a satisfactory way.

By the end of the project, the BPMA had purchased photogrammetry software which has enabled us to try 3D imaging for ourselves – and the results are extremely promising. These techniques can be learnt by our staff and employed to create 3D models of items in the museum collection for exploration by the public.

This new-found knowledge, though still fairly elementary, has given us confidence to explore other uses for 3D imaging. In December 3D experts, ScanLab Projects, spent a week scanning the work depot, platforms and tunnels of Mail Rail which we will be opening to the public in 2016 as part of our plans for The Postal Museum. The results are truly astounding and we hope to show them in the near future.

Scanner capturing Mount Pleasant platform

Scanner capturing Mount Pleasant platform

Beyond all this, the project has given us an opportunity to revisit the objects and see them afresh. Although we weren’t able to obtain good 3D models of objects such as the large printing plates and the rollers, we did get excellent images of a number of dies using a technique known as Reflectance Transformation Imaging [RTI]. We also obtained an excellent laser-scanned 3D model of the Machin cast of Queen Elizabeth II – a truly unique and iconic object. The fruits of these experiments will eventually be made available via our website and online catalogue as we integrate the technology.

Plaster head of HM the Queen made by Arnold Machin for new definitive issue of stamps, third version (POST 118/5373)

Plaster head of HM the Queen made by Arnold Machin for new definitive issue of stamps, third version (POST 118/5373)

-Martin Devereux, Head of Digital

Capturing Mail Rail: 3D survey of the depot, loop and platforms

Last week was an exciting one for the Digital team here at BPMA! For the past five days, Rachel and I have been accompanying ScanLAB Projects Ltd. while they undertake a 3D survey of Mail Rail.

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Scanner capturing the west platform.

 

ScanLAB have been targeting the areas of the network that are to be the focus of our Mail Rail  visitor attraction – that is the work depot at Mount Pleasant, the platforms beneath Mount Pleasant and the tunnel loop from the depot to the platforms – just about 1km of tunnels.

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Will from Scanlab discusses the technology with guests from FARO, New Scientist and Harry (BPMA Communications Manager).

 

The 3D scanning of Mail Rail is important in that it captures the industrial heritage of an unexplored and little-known feature of central London. The survey records the details and the features of Mail Rail as a working space, with all the flotsam and jetsam left behind when the service was suspended. From tools and equipment to newspapers and calendars from over a decade ago, Mail Rail is a time capsule just waiting to be explored. These features will inevitably be tidied up when we open it to the public so it is crucial to capture that detail for posterity.

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Thomas and Will from Scanlab sharing the raw data.

 

The survey will allow users to see these features in three dimensions – bringing the platforms to life in ways not possible even when the train ride is running. The survey can be shown via the web and used in the exhibitions we create at the Postal Museum and Mail Rail attraction to offer a truly explorative experience of Mail Rail in a way that the train ride cannot. Imagine navigating the tunnels and platforms for yourself?

Scanner on the platform.

Scanner on the platform.

Using the latest scanning technology from FARO, and using the surveying and imaging expertise of ScanLAB, we will be obtaining as faithful a representation of the site as we possibly can. From the work depot to the platforms and the tunnels in the loop around Mount Pleasant, we will be recording a truly significant piece of Britain’s industrial history.

-Martin Devereux, Head of Digital