Tag Archives: scanning

Capturing Mail Rail in 3D: The Next Steps

Imagine a place frozen in time, left exactly as it was the day that everyone left it. That is what it’s like in Mail Rail today. After it was mothballed in 2003, everything was left as it was that day, down to the newspapers, rota and personal belongings. This time capsule effect is part of what makes Mail Rail unique and exciting; however when we start construction later this year to convert it into a ride and visitor attraction we’ll have to make a few changes to ensure it’s safe and accessible for visitors. We are keen that the space remains as true to how it is now as possible, but these changes mean that the little things could be lost. We thought long and hard about how we could preserve Mail Rail exactly as it is today. The solution we came up with was 3D scanning.

Just before Christmas ScanLAB Projects, a 3D scanning and visualisation company based in East London, spent a week down in Mail Rail and captured the Mount Pleasant depot, loop and platforms in 3D. In total they completed over 223 terrestrial laser scans with incredible and accurate results.

View of the Mount Pleasant platforms

View of the Mount Pleasant platforms

The scans that ScanLAB have created show all the minute detail of the spaces, preserving Mail Rail as it is now for us all to explore in years to come, including parts of Mail Rail that visitors to the site won’t be able to see, such as the train graveyard.

Capture

Fly-through of the train graveyard

 

Of course the results have got our creative gears spinning. Increasingly visitors are expecting an increased level of digital interactivity from a visitor to a museum, allowing them to interact with exhibits and collections through devices such as smart phones and tablets, before, during and after their visit – but how can we use these scans to enhance the visitor experience, both physically and remotely?

The guys at ScanLAB gave us a demo of just this; using an Oculus Rift headset we explored the train graveyard and the depot. BPMA staff delighted in walking around, reaching out to touch trains and walls, and even ‘sitting’ in one of the trains!

Looking around the Mount Pleasant Depot through Oculus Rift headset

Other possibilities include augmented reality apps for smart devices, projections or 3D printed installations –the options are endless– so what would you do with them?

Stamp printing plates, dies and rollers: from vault to view

Over the next year, our Philatelic and Digital teams will be working with UCL’s Mona Hess, Research Associate and PhD candidate at UCL, to digitise objects from our collections, including printing dies, rollers and plates. These objects are difficult to photograph and not available for consultation by the public. This project, funded by Share Academy, will provide access to these important objects through a combination of a number of technologies. The final output will be set of 3D digital objects for use by philatelic enthusiasts, researchers and the general public. This blog will regularly update you on what is happening along the way.

Mona discusses various imaging techniques and engagement outputs for the 3D objects. A stamp plate sits at the centre of the table.

Mona discusses various imaging techniques and engagement outputs for the 3D objects. A stamp plate sits at the centre of the table.

Last Friday (24 January), we held a kick-off meeting for our Philatelic 3D digitisation project, a Share Academy project partnership with UCL. Because of the highly-reflective surfaces of these objects, a combination of technologies will be trialled to see which works best.  Some of the objects can be captured at the BPMA’s premises using techniques such as photogrammetry. Others, however, may need to be transported to UCL to be digitised with their large-format 3D scanning device.

Original Heath die of Penny Black with various other dies. (POST 118/1733)

Original Heath die of Penny Black (centre) with various other dies. (POST 118/1733). The reflective and finely-engraved surface makes them difficult to photograph.

Another highlight of the meeting was the demonstration of a possible output for the 3D objects: a mobile/tablet application. The Petrie Museum engages visitors using an application that explores the history of the Nile Valley with 3D digitised objects that can be manipulated by users.

Over the next month, our Philatelic team will be selecting various objects to be captured in the trials (due to take place from March), as well as planning any transportation of objects, where necessary, to UCL.

Are there any particular objects in the Philatelic collection that you want to see as 3D objects? 

-Rachel Kasbohm, Digital Media Manager