Tag Archives: stamp vending machine

We have a Post & Go machine!

We are delighted have a fully functioning Royal Mail Post & Go machine in our Archive Search Room foyer from today. After installation and testing last Friday the machine is now operational and available to visitors. This makes the BPMA the first place to get a permanent Royal Mail Hytech Post & Go machine outside an exhibition environment.

Curator, Julian Stray, using the Royal Mail's Post and Go machine, newly installed in the foyer of the British Postal Museum & Archive.

Curator, Julian Stray, using the Royal Mail’s Post and Go machine, newly installed in the foyer of the British Postal Museum & Archive.

Post & Go machines produce self-adhesive stamps on demand and are usually located in Post Office branches. Post & Go stamps are proving to be very popular with collectors and we are expecting long queues in our Search Room foyer today.

Our Post & Go machine holds two different stamp designs, which will be changed 3-4 times a year. The first stamps will be the special Christmas Robin and the standard Machin designs. A unique overprint has been especially designed for the BPMA machine, reading “The B.P.M.A.”.

Douglas Muir, BPMA Curator of Philately, is the first official user of the Royal Mail's Post and Go machine, newly installed in the foyer of the British Postal Museum & Archive.

Douglas Muir, BPMA Curator of Philately, is the first official user of the Royal Mail’s Post and Go machine, newly installed in the foyer of the British Postal Museum & Archive.

Please note that the machine only accepts credit and debit cards, and is only available to visitors to the BPMA.

Christmas Robin stamps from our Post & Go machine.

Christmas Robin stamps from our Post & Go machine.

Machin stamps from our Post & Go machine.

Machin stamps from our Post & Go machine.

A receipt from our Post & Go machine.

A receipt from our Post & Go machine.

Visit our website to find out more about our Post & Go machine.

BPMA in the Lord Mayor’s Show

Those of us who participated in the Lord Mayor’s Show on Saturday had a fantastic time. It was the first time our 1930s Mobile Post Office, GPO2, had been on the road in 30 years and its journey was undertaken without incident.

GPO2 in the parade. (Photo by Anne-Grethe Jensen)

GPO2 in the parade. (Photo by Anne-Grethe Jensen)

Staff and Friends of the BPMA along with a strong contingent from the Postal History Society walked alongside GPO2 carrying special umbrellas. The BPMA umbrellas will soon be on sale in our online shop.

Walking along with BPMA and Postal History Society umbrellas.

Walking along with BPMA and Postal History Society umbrellas.

Being cheered along by thousands of people was a unique experience, and from a museum point of view it was exciting to see the crowds point out the various details on GPO2, including the stamp vending machine advertising stamps for 1d.

The stamp vending machine and posting aperture, which are built into the side of GPO2.

The stamp vending machine and posting aperture, which are built into the side of GPO2.

Below are some photos taken by parade participants and those who watched us in the crowd. More photos can be found on Flickr. BPMA Friend Glenn Morgan has also uploaded some photos and videos to Flickr.

The BBC’s coverage of the Lord Mayor’s Show can be seen on BBC iPlayer (we appear about 45 minutes into the broadcast). Also available on iPlayer is a BBC London interview with our Curator Chris Taft about our participation in the event (fast forward 2 hours and 10 minutes to hear it).

In the cab and ready to roll: driver Clive and his son. In front: John from The Postal History Society, who dressed up in an old Post Office uniform.

In the cab and ready to roll: driver Clive and his son. In front: John from The Postal History Society, who dressed up in an old Post Office uniform.

Also in the parade were a number of black cabs from different eras.

Also in the parade were a number of black cabs from different eras.

Inspectors from Battersea Dogs & Cats Home.

Inspectors from Battersea Dogs & Cats Home.

One of several carnival groups.

One of several carnival groups.

Lions Club International had a huge inflatable Earth on their float.

Lions Club International had a huge inflatable Earth on their float.

The London Field Hospital move off in the parade.

The London Field Hospital move off in the parade.

The AA, with their fleet of old vehicles. Thankfully we didn’t need their assistance during the parade.

The AA, with their fleet of old vehicles. Thankfully we didn’t need their assistance during the parade.

This float was behind us in the parade. They sang the virtues of a new shopping centre in Cheapside the entire way – we still have their songs in our heads!

This float was behind us in the parade. They sang the virtues of a new shopping centre in Cheapside the entire way – we still have their songs in our heads!

Driving past the official party. (Photo by Peter Dare)

Driving past the official party. (Photo by Peter Dare)

The Lord Mayor’s Aide-de-Camp after he posted some mail in GPO2 on behalf of the Lord Mayor. In the stand above are the Lord Mayor and the rest of the official party.

The Lord Mayor’s Aide-de-Camp after he posted some mail in GPO2 on behalf of the Lord Mayor. In the stand above are the Lord Mayor and the rest of the official party.

There were big crowds watching the parade near St Pauls Cathedral, including many in specially erected stands.

There were big crowds watching the parade near St Pauls Cathedral, including many in specially erected stands.

The parade takes a lunch break in this side street off Aldwych.

The parade takes a lunch break in this side street off Aldwych.

Back on the road… A group representing Hong Kong.

Back on the road… A group representing Hong Kong.

Workers take a break from building Crossrail to watch the parade.

Workers take a break from building Crossrail to watch the parade.

This lady was happy to see us!

This lady was happy to see us!

We pass the Nomura building in St Martins-le-Grand, once the site of GPO Headquarters.

We pass the Nomura building in St Martins-le-Grand, once the site of GPO Headquarters.

Notes from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum curator’s workshop

by Steve Wright, Colne Valley Postal History Musuem

With just over a week to go before our first Open Day as part of London 2010: Festival of Stamps, it has been a frantic all-hands-on-deck time to get things ready here at Colne Valley Postal Museum.

The restoration of our 1935 Jubilee Telephone Kiosk has not proceeded as far as I would have liked and it now looks unlikely that it will be on site and complete by May 29th; hopefully it will all be here in time for our second Open Day on 10th July. This was caused by one of the key restorers being stranded in Spain by volcanic dust – which lost us two weeks in the schedule.

Telegraph head at Colne Valley Postal History Museum

Telegraph head at Colne Valley Postal History Museum

The good news is that a third large telegraph pole has arrived and been erected, and fitted with new arms to display 14 different types of insulators from our collection. Together with the two existing poles, this brings to 27 the total of different types of telegraph insulator on display. It also allowed another, different, George V notice plate to be displayed on the correct type of pole. Ultimately, the poles will allow the Push Button A mechanism in the restored kiosk to be connected to the national network. All the poles have been shortened to allow our visitors to get a good view of the signage and pole furniture that would normally be 22 feet above us!

Colne Valley Postal History Museum's Type D pillar box, 1932

Colne Valley Postal History Museum's Type D pillar box, 1932

On the post box front, our Type D pillar of 1932 has now been fitted with a second enamel notice plate – the vertical format “coin drop” notice – and has also been fitted with a Type F booklet dispensing mechanism. This will be operational, sadly at the rate of 50 pence instead of 2d – on the day. Our other George V boxes are being cleaned or repainted and a very special project is lined up for a spare GR wall box we have – watch this space!

Two more vintage Stamp Vending Machines have been restored – one from the early reign of George V. This was shown and demonstrated successfully during our visit to the Post Office Vehicles Club rally in April and it will be available and working on the Open Days for visitors to try. It is believed to date from 1912-1915 and is an original Kermode mechanism.

The Philatelic element has not been forgotten and the displays on the day will feature enlargements of some of the best-known designs from the King George V reign together with our own extensive displays of Seahorse high values overprinted for use abroad: pages from Nauru, British Bechuanaland, Bechuanaland Protectorate, Levant, Morroco, Tangier and the Irish Free State will be on display.

Colne Valley Postal History Museum will be open on 29th May, 10th July and 11th and 12th September 2010, and by appointment to groups. For further information on the open days please see the London 2010: Festival of Stamps website.

GPO Street Furniture Discover Session

This Saturday our Curators will be throwing open the doors of our Museum Store, where some of the larger items in our collection are housed, and helping people view and explore some of the classic items of street furniture which shape our urban and rural landscape.

Few of us take notice of the humble pillar box at the end of our street, yet it is an essential part of our lives. Such everyday items have a fascinating history and have been through many changes in their history. From the size and design of the aperture, to the colour, shape and internal workings of the box itself, each evolution reflects both changing technologies and changing needs.

A Scottish lamp box bearing the Scottish Crown instead of the EIIR cypher

A Scottish lamp box bearing the Scottish Crown instead of the EIIR cypher

Lamp boxes were first trialled in 1896 for residents in fashionable London Squares who required a nearby posting facility so their letters written late at night could catch the midnight or early morning collections.

There have also been regional differences in street furniture design. In Scotland Royal Mail street furniture, vehicles and buildings bear the Scottish Crown rather than the cypher of Queen Elizabeth – EIIR. This is due to complaints that Her Majesty is not the second Queen Elizabeth of Scotland, but the first.

Street furniture produced for Royal Mail and the Post Office has often been innovative. A telephone kiosk in the BPMA’s collection includes a stamp vending machine, perhaps a pioneering example of the current trend in technology for convergence.

Other topics to be covered on the day include wall boxes, Stamp Vending Machines, sub-stations, manhole covers, milestones, signage, pouch boxes and PODS. So, if you’ve ever wondered what’s inside a pillar box, why telephone kiosks have sloping floors or how ‘posties’ manage to deliver to so many homes from such a small mail bag, join us at the Museum Store this Saturday.

The GPO Street Furniture Discover Session will take place at the BPMA’s Museum Store on Saturday 20th June from 11am-3pm. For further information, and to book, please see our website. A Discover Session on Square Pillar Boxes will take place on Saturday 19 September.