Tag Archives: Valentines Card

Valentines Day

Throughout the ages people have exchanged love tokens, from bunches of flowers to text messages. Within our collections we hold examples of written and artistic love tokens which have been sent through the post, including Valentines Cards, letters and even special greetings telegrams. Today in honour of St Valentine we have uploaded some of these to Flickr and our new Pinterest profile.

Double cobweb valentine card. French. A chromolithograph card with a gilt border.Tassel pulls to reveal lovers and bride and groom. Message reads 'Pense a moi'. 19th century (OB1996.86)

Double cobweb valentine card. French. A chromolithograph card with a gilt border.Tassel pulls to reveal lovers and bride and groom. Message reads ‘Pense a moi’. 19th century (OB1996.86)

In addition to the newly uploaded images we have plenty more about Valentines Day and Valentines Cards online. Further images of Valentines Cards, including some made in our Victorian Valentines workshops, have been collected on Flickr. And you can read more on the story of Valentines Cards and greetings in our online exhibition Valentines Day: Passion Through the Post or in The Peoples Post: Love Letters.

Valentine’s at Blists Hill

In February, BPMA will be displaying a small selection of Valentine’s cards at Blists Hill Victorian Town in Ironbridge. These will complement the Victorian Post Office as well as the family activities linked to the cards which will take place in the Goods Shed on the site from Saturday 11th to Sunday 19th February.

A selection of cards we may use for the display if they are in adequate condition.

A selection of cards we may use for the display if they are in adequate condition.

Despite the display being relatively small and only open for just over a week, a lot of planning and preparation is needed to make sure the items chosen are going to be interesting to the public, easy to transport and that they will be safe and secure while on the site.

This week, three of us visited Blists Hill in order to take some measurements in readiness for the arrival of the cards in February. This meant my first use of a hygrometer (sadly not the whirling variety) to test relative humidity in the display area, tests for light and UV, and taking some simpler length and width measurements of the room so that the appropriately sized case can be ordered.

Exhibitions Officer Dominique Bignall and Head of Heritage Chris Taft check levels in the Museum of the Post Office in the Community while we are on site.

Exhibitions Officer Dominique Bignall and Head of Heritage Chris Taft check levels in the Museum of the Post Office in the Community while we are on site.

It also gave us the opportunity to do some tests in the Museum of the Post Office in Community and determine which items might need to be replaced or refreshed to give them a rest from being on display.

The Post Office at Blists Hill.

The Post Office at Blists Hill.

Visits like these are really important to make sure we get more of our collection seen by more people. If you are in the area between 11 and 19 February, pop in and see the display – some unexpected interpretations of Valentine’s will be on show – and come and make a card of your own in the Goods Shed!

– Laura Dixon, Learning Officer (Events & Outreach)

The Last Post

The final episode of The Peoples Post reminded us of some of the postal service’s great innovations. These included William Dockwra’s Penny Post, the development of the Mail Coach system, Rowland Hill’s postal reforms, the invention of the postage stamp, and the introduction of curb-side letter boxes.

Exterior of a Sub-Post Office, Bristol, 1980 (H11401c)

Exterior of a Sub-Post Office, Bristol, 1980 (H11401c)

Throughout the series we have also heard about how the postcode has changed our lives, and the ways in which cheap postage and telecommunications, developed in Britain, have made it easier to keep in touch and send our love.

With Christmas just two days away many of us are preparing to travel to be with family and friends. Seeing people in person is the ultimate way to communicate, but if you can’t there’s always the post. Leave your views on The Peoples Post series as a comment below, on our Facebook page, or tweet us using the hashtag #PeoplesPost.

For more on today’s episode of The Peoples Post see our webpage The Last Post. Further images can be found on Flickr. Use the Twitter hashtag #PeoplesPost to comment on the show.

Valentine Cards

As we heard in today’s episode of The Peoples Post, the introduction of cheap postage sent shockwaves through prim and proper Victorian society; private correspondence could now be sent cheaply, meaning anyone could express their love freely. While the likes of Blackwoods Magazine thundered…

The post-office system offers a facility for clandestine correspondence which no respectable father or mother on the European side of the Atlantic would think of without a shudder

…the truth of the matter was that love tokens, whether in the form of letters or cards, had been exchanged by the upper and middle classes in large numbers for several centuries, and less commonly before then.

As today, such expressions of love were often quite elaborate and beautiful, and some were written in code. Below are some of the more interesting examples from our collection.

'Your love my happiness' - c.1870 (OB1995.165/1A)

'Your love my happiness' - c.1870 (OB1995.165/1A). Valentine card with gilt silver embossed paper lace around edges with pink fabric flowers. Gold scrap at bottom bearing greeting. Chromolithograph girl with flowers in centre surrounded by fabric and waxed flowers with net at top.

'To My Valentine' - c.1890 (OB1995.166)

'To My Valentine' - c.1890 (OB1995.166). Chromolithograph valentine fan with 12 segments. Elaborate embossed design, gilt on handheld parts. Primroses and forget-me-nots design, with pretty ladies on each head. Each segment bears a verse: To My Valentine/ Dearer than all life's/ Joys art thou,/ A treasure without eclipse/ My heart beats proudly/ To know I share/ A love that is oure and free/ To feel there is one in/ The world doth spare/ Full many a thought/ For me. With warmest affection. Decorated with tassels and ribbon.

'My Valentine/ I love you' - c.1900 (OB1996.93/1)

'My Valentine/ I love you' - c.1900 (OB1996.93/1). A mechanical card of a girl typing a valentine message. At the bottom of the card are the words: Write me a letter love.

'To the one I love' Valentine Card - c.1900 (OB1996.93/2)

'To the one I love' Valentine Card - c.1900 (OB1996.93/2). A mechanical card of a girl with scurrying feet bringing valentine hearts in a dish.

Pop up valentine card - 20th Century (OB1996.94)

Pop up valentine card - 20th Century (OB1996.94). Depicts a honey house surrounded by heart with wings, and a googly-eyed girl. Message reads: Oh may I dare. To ask of thee/ A place within/ Thy heart for me?

– Alison Bean, Web Officer

For more on Valentine cards visit the Royal Mail Archive to read The Valentine and its Origins by Frank Staff or visit our website to view our online exhibition Valentine’s Day – Passion through the post.

For more on today’s episode of The Peoples Post see our webpage Love Letters. Further images can be found on Flickr. Use the Twitter hashtag #PeoplesPost to comment on the show.

Britain’s Postal Heritage

Bettina Trabant, Postal Heritage Officer at Bruce Castle Museum, will speak at the BPMA on 8th April. The focus of her talk will be Bruce Castle’s postal history collection, some of which has been highlighted on this blog in recent months.

An embroidered Valentines Day card from Bruce Castle's postal history collection

An embroidered Valentines Day card from Bruce Castle's postal history collection

The BPMA is currently working with Bruce Castle and the Communications Worker’s Union (CWU) to widen access to the Morten Collection, collected by former postal worker W.V. Morten. When Morten died in the 1920’s the Union of Communication Workers (now the CWU) recognised the importance of the collection and purchased it. Since then it has been housed at Bruce Castle, expanding from 8,000 items to more than 30,000.

Highlights of the Bruce Castle Museum Postal History Collection include material related to the TPO (Travelling Post Office), mail coaches, trade union history, stamps, Valentines cards, and Sir Rowland Hill, who at one point lived at Bruce Castle where he was headmaster of a school. The oldest object in the collection is a letter from Normandy sent in 1397.

Bettina Trabant’s talk is free and booking details can be found on our website.

Launch of the new Guide to the Museum Collection

by Victoria Heath, Development Assistant

The BPMA are pleased to announce the launch of a new publication – Guide to the Museum Collection – the first publication of its kind from the BPMA to showcase the items in the museum collection.

The guide has been a work in progress since early 2009 combining the work of the Development Assistant and the Curatorial Team. It was identified that there is no real publication that showcases the vast array of materials within the museum collection and that as much is kept at the museum store in Debden, Essex or within the secure areas of the archive in London a guide such as this would be an ideal way to reach those visitors who might not be able to travel to the collection. The guide also serves as the ideal souvenir for those attending events at the museum store such as for the open afternoons and evenings or the family events.

Personally, I found it very enjoyable putting the guide together as I do not work with the museum collection too much in my daily role. The most enjoyable part was the 12 hour day out at the museum store photographing the objects with two colleagues and the professional photographers. It was a long day but I believe it was worth it when I see how fantastic the images are.

The images shown here are just a few that feature in the guide. More, including some which didn’t make the guide, can be seen on Flickr.

Painting of St Martins le Grand by James Pollard

Painting of St Martins le Grand by James Pollard

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol

Chromolithograph valentine fan with 12 segments

Chromolithograph valentine fan with 12 segments

Pillar Boxes at the Museum Store

Pillar Boxes at the Museum Store

1970 BSA Bantam motorcycle

1970 BSA Bantam motorcycle

The guide is available in the online shop priced at £5 + postage and packaging.